Is Virginia Winner Take-All? Here's How This Swing State Could Affect The Election

TOPSHOT - People cast their votes for US president November 8, 2016, at Centerville High School, in Centreville, Virginia. Polling stations opened Tuesday as the first ballots were cast in the long-awaited election pitting Hillary Clinton against Donald Trump. / AFP / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Source: PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images

As Americans eagerly await the results of the presidential election, there is no doubt that the future presidency is in the hands of several key swing states, including Virginia. Although Virginia is still "too early to call," a lot of voters are wondering: Is Virginia winner take-all? In other words, just how much of an influence will the state of Virginia have on the election? The answer is yes, Virginia is a winner take-all state in presidential elections — therefore all of the state's electoral votes will go toward one candidate in the election on Nov. 8. This has several implications for the candidates, depending on how tonight's results go. 

Before election results started coming in Tuesday night, Virginia was projected to go blue, with an 85.5 percent of Clinton victory. Although Virginia's electoral votes are nowhere near as substantial as some other swing states' like Florida (29) or Ohio (18), the state still may have a significant impact on this already close race. Whichever candidate wins Virginia will decidedly win all 13 of these electoral votes, as the only states in the U.S. that aren't "winner take-all states" are Nebraska and Maine; with Florida's votes still uncounted, and both swing states up in the air, this election could very well be determined by the way these two states lean. 

As of publishing, the results from Virginia are too early to called; this post will be updated to reflect Virginia's status when it is reported. 

This post is updating ... 

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