This Is How Sheet Glass Is Made (Okay, That Sounds Boring But You Honestly Won't Be Able To Look Away)—VIDEO

391681 03: Workers prepare sheets of bulletproof glass for their transformation into windshields at the Oran Palmach factory in Kibbutz Zova July 10, 2001 in central Israel. Oran Palmach, which began as a factory manufacturing standard car windshields, was first commissioned by the Israeli Defense Forces to design shatterproof and then bulletproof glass during the first Palestinian Intifada, and is now the exclusive manufacturer of bulletproof and terrorproof glass in Israel exporting of some 50% of its output. With continuing Palestinian shooting attacks against Israeli civilian and military targets in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and more recently the introduction of roadside bombs against these targets, the factory has increased its production by at least 20%. (Photo by David Silverman/Getty Images)
Source: David Silverman/Getty Images News/Getty Images

You know how in The Lord Of The Rings, they cryptically show the secret wielding of the one ring to rule them all? Well, seeing things as eerily beautiful as that is just a day in the life for the people who carry out the mesmerizing process of making sheet glass. The tools that the workers use are ridiculously heavy and the furnace that they use to melt down the glass looks nefariously hot. And yet, somehow, when you see the glass get melted down on a surface and flipped around like a glowing, molten lava pancake, you'll completely forget about the extremely hazardous environment, and a slow trickle of drool will start to form on your chin. 

After they flip around this miniature mound of sunshine, it somehow fits perfectly into a roller and flattens out in the most visually satisfying way you can imagine. I've decided to save this video for future use because I'm pretty sure by using it I would never lose an argument again. Any time that I'm starting to falter, I could just pop this video in and BAM! We'd both be incapacitated and the fight would be over in an instant. Maybe people should start showing this in high-security prisons and in the classrooms where kids all sit before SAT tests, while they're at it. 

The video was produced by KOG Glass, the oldest art glass company in America. They also have a website where they sell their eye-popping, vibrant glass pieces. I still have no idea how the artists managed to manipulate the glass to look like that, but I'll go ahead and just assume it is magic until someone releases an equally mesmerizing video outlining it. In the meantime, prepare yourself to be awash with calm and amazed by the ridiculous perfection of sheet glass making: 

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