Read Jennifer Hibben-White's Impassioned Facebook Plea To The Anti-Vaxxers Who Put Her Kids At Risk

On Jan. 27 this year, Jennifer Hibben-White was with her two children — a three-year-old and a 15-day-old newborn — at their family doctor's office in Toronto on January 27 for a post-birth weighing. Later, the office informed her that she and her children had possibly been exposed to measles, and needed to remain in isolation for the next 21 days. Her oldest child has received the first of the two shots against measles, but the infant was too young for the vaccine, leaving her kids particularly vulnerable. In a Facebook post that has been shared around the world, Hibben-White reflected on her last "week from hell."

She begins by addressing her patient zero:

The post has had more than 225,000 shares in less than 24 hours.

Many parents opt to not vaccinate their children out of fear that the vaccine could cause autism. This myth has been debunked, having first appeared in the late 1990s in a study alleging a connection between autism and the vaccine for measles. The journal that published the study has since issued a formal retraction, and ten out of the 13 authors now say it never should have been released.

Hibben-White also addressed the autism debate in her post:

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According to the Centers for Disease Control, there has been a 99 percent decrease in measles since the pre-vaccine era. Worldwide it causes about 17 deaths every hour, as compared to 644 people in the U.S. in the whole of 2014. The disease was officially declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. Recently, measles has made a comeback; an outbreak that began in California's Disneyland has since spread to 18 states.

Hidden-White's call to action is emotional throughout, but also direct:

She reminds us of the legitimate concerns feared by parents prior to the advent of vaccinations, when infant mortality was more commonplace — and that this situation, right now, is an unfortunate and unnecessary burden for today's parents to bear.

The full post reads:

Image: Getty Images (1)