Kenya Bombs Al Shabab's Somalia Bases In Retaliation For The Garissa University Attack

Kenyan Defence Forces run towards the Garissa University campus after an attack by Somalia's Al-Qaeda-linked Shebab gunmen in Garissa on April 2, 2015. At least 70 students were massacred when Somalia's Shebab Islamist group attacked a Kenyan university today, the interior minister said, the deadliest attack in the country since US embassy bombings in 1998. AFP PHOTO / CARL DE SOUZA (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
Source: CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images

In response to last week's deadly attack on a college campus, Kenya has bombed militant group al Shabab's Somalia bases, a military spokesman said on Monday. Air strikes were launched against two al Shabab camps in Gondodowe and Ismail on Sunday night, the first major military response to the attack on Garissa University that left 148 dead. Following the shooting, President Uhuru Kenyatta promised a swift response in "the severest way possible."

No further information regarding the operation was made available, Kenyan army spokesman David Obonyo told the BBC. Reuters reported that a military source said the extent of damage or the estimated death toll was difficult to determine due to cloud cover. The Gedo region, the location where the strikes took place, borders Somalia and is used by Al Shabab militants to cross into Kenya, an unnamed spokesman told The Guardian.

We targeted the two areas because according to information we have, those Al Shabab fellows are coming from there to attack Kenya.

In a tweet posted by Kenya's interior ministry, the government named Mohamed Mohamud as the person responsible for planning and leading the terrorist attack. CNN reported that Mohamud is "credited with having an extensive terrorist network within Kenya." A reward for 20 million Kenyan shillings, or roughly $220,000 in U.S. dollars, is being offered for the "Most Wanted" man.

[Twitter Embed: https://twitter.com/InteriorKE/statuses/584647516605566976]


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