Metro-North Crash Investigated By NTSB, Governor Cuomo Blames High Speeds

Over the Thanksgiving weekend, a train on Metro-North's Hudson Line derailed on its way into Manhattan. Now, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is investigating Sunday's fatal accident to figure out why the crash happened, and state governor Andrew Cuomo believes that high speeds were at fault. The NTSB says it is in the process of analyzing the train’s data recorders to determine if excessive speed, mechanical problems, or human error played a role in the crash. Four people were killed in the crash, and more than 60 injured.

Though the NTSB has not made any concrete determinations about what caused the derailment, Cuomo explained on the Today Show that he thinks speed will likely be a factor. “I think it’s going to turn out to be about speed more than anything and the operator’s operation of the train at that time," he said. “It was actually much worse than it looked." Cuomo called the crash site "your worst nightmare."

Bustle previously reported on the accident:

The seven-car train set off from Poughkeepsie at 6:54 EST Sunday, according to the MTA. At roughly 7:20 a.m., five of the train’s seven cars derailed roughly 100 yards north of Spuyten Duyvilstation, on a curved section of the track. Although reports initially indicated that some cars had gone into the water, the MTA maintained that no part of the train had either entered the Hudson or Harlem rivers.According to one passenger, the train “left them [tracks] because it went too fast,” but details of the accident have yet to be confirmed.

The train was only about half full when it crashed, carrying in it roughly 150 passengers, officials have said. Four people have been confirmed dead, 11 are in critical condition and six are in serious condition with non-life threatening injuries. The remaining 46 sustained only minor injuries.passengers, officials have said. Four people have been confirmed dead, 11 are in critical condition and six are in serious condition with non-life threatening injuries.

The federal investigation into the crash also means that reopening the Metro-North Hudson line for regular travel after Monday's accident could take up to a week. The Hudson line is currently offering limited service from Poughkeepsie to Grand Central Station in Manhattan, but commuters are required to take shuttles from Yonkers to Grand Central.

“This is a very busy line, and it’s going to be problematic for commuters,” Governor Cuomo explained.