Perverts Are Using AirDrop To Send NSFW Pictures On The Subway Because Nothing Is Sacred

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In many ways, phones are a godsend for subway riders. Don't feel like making eye contact with the manspreader in the seat across from you? Pop in your headphones and scroll through Instagram until you can make your escape. But even your beloved phone can be turned against you. Apparently,  AirDropping NSFW pictures on the subway is the latest, greatest trend among that particular group of men who have made it their personal mission to force strangers to look at their genitalia. You know,because women weren't already inundated on all sides with dick pics.

On Saturday, the New York Post published an article in which several subway riders said they had discovered (unwanted) dick pics on their phones via AirDrop. For the less than tech savvy, AirDrop allows iOS users to share and receive content with other Apple devices nearby. The default setting is to accept documents from only your contacts, but if you have it set to “everyone,” any Apple user nearby can send you content — like, say, a photo of their penis.

That’s exactly what happened to New Yorker Britta Carlson, who told the Post that she had her phone set to receive photos from everyone because it was useful at work. She was riding the subway in July when she was AirDropped a note from a stranger. She accepted it, and suddenly she was staring at a close-up of someone’s junk. She aptly compared the incident to being flashed.

The worst part? AirDrop only works if the devices are within Bluetooth range, which is approximately 328 feet. The people sending these photos are probably on the same train, but victims may never know who virtually flashed them.

Unfortunately for your faith in humanity, this isn't the first time similar incidents have made the news. In 2015, UK police investigated a "cyber-flashing" case after a woman riding the Underground was AirDropped two photos of an unknown man's penis.

In case you were wondering, flashing is considered indecent exposure, which is illegal. Prosecuting the cyber-flasher is easier said than done, but according to Gothamist, security consultants suggest saving the unsavory photo as evidence for when you report the incident to police.

Fabrizio Verrechia/Unsplash

To check your AirDrop settings, simply swipe up from the bottom of your phone. AirDrop is directly under the brightness bar; tap on it to change the settings. If you've experienced cyber-flashing yourself — or any other kind of exposure, for that matter — on a train, contact the Metropolitan Transportation Authority here. I'll leave with a message to all would-be flashers: Literally nobody wants to see your junk. Go away.