Wellness

Can’t Sleep? Try These Hacks 12 Women Swear By

Snooze city, population you.

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"It’s no wonder people suffer from poor sleep during lockdown," Dr. Lina Velikova M.D. tells Bustle. "Isolation, uncertainty, and anxiety can trigger greater irritability, decrease our concentration, and make us tired." Here's how 12 women are trying to get better sleep.

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1. Read Before Bed

"My suggestion would be to read a book or novel before going to bed. Try to avoid watching TV, [or looking at your] mobile, iPad, and anything with a digitally lit screen. Take a soothing bath — going from warm water into a cooler bedroom will cause your body temperature to drop, making you feel sleepy." — Jennifer, 28

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2. Prime Your Bedroom For Sleep

"Create a sanctuary. Make the act of going to bed a nourishing and calming experience. Use relaxing essential oils to stimulate calm, with a diffuser, roll-on, or pillow spray." - Sonya, 29

3. Do A Foot Soak

"I love a good foot soak in front of the TV for 20 to 40 minutes every night when I can. I add salts, essential oil, and dried flower petals to the warm water for an extra beautiful ritual. This alone is magic for me — it always helps me sleep like a baby." - Lisa, 34

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4. Stretch For Better Zzz's

"I practice yoga right before bed through Zoom or fitness apps. I found that doing a quick class before bed really helped calm my nerves. I had no idea that Amazon and Pandora play meditation music, and it’s helped me considerably. I've started to add a warm shower before bed, too." - Violette, 48

5. Guided Meditations Really Work

"I typically always slept solidly until quarantine. My mind would be racing and frantically thinking about everything I had to accomplish. Lately I've been utilizing the Calm app, and it has worked wonders. The sleep stories are incredible. I haven’t successfully completed a single story!" - Meagan, 24

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6. Upgrade Your Sheet Situation

"Silk pillowcases. They’re seriously a game changer! And use a comfortable sleep mask. Make sure you can breathe well. I recently discovered that I have allergic adenoids and it was the reason I was waking up very tired. I started using a nose spray and it worked like magic!" - Paula, 37

7. Journal It Out

"It sounds simple, but keep a physical notebook. At the end of each day you write down any wins you had that day — big, little, and everything in between — and write out your schedule for the next day. Knowing what's on your plate for the next day keeps the mind from being overwhelmed." — E.B., 42

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8. Remove Mental & Physical Clutter

"Wrap up your evening at the same-ish time, and keep your sleep space tidy. I try to mentally go over what I need to do the next day. That way, I can get out anything that might be weighing on me. I've noticed if I don't do this, then I will have a more difficult time falling asleep." - Kristen, 30

9. Stick To A Schedule

"Create a routine that will prepare you mentally for sleep, especially with added stresses in the midst of a pandemic. Start with a cup of caffeine-free tea, take a bath, empty your mind by writing out thoughts for the following day, and end with brushing your teeth and washing your face." - Karin, 30s

10. Use Your Time Wisely

"When you're working from home, sleep in and take a shower during your lunch break. Most people end up working longer hours during quarantine, because work takes longer to do, so you can save time for lunch at the end of the break, or eat while perusing emails in the early afternoon." - Jenna, 30s

11. Tire Yourself Out

"I learned quickly that my sleep is much better if I've done some kind of physical activity that day — mostly workouts. It tires me out physically and mentally. I also set an alarm in the morning. I don't love it in the moment, but when it's time for bed that night, I fall asleep easier." - Kalyn, 28

12. Work With Your Energy's Ebbs & Flows

"I feel like I have more energy toward the end of the night without having to deal with commuting, planning out tomorrow's outfit, and the day-to-day office bustle, so I've adjusted myself to start winding down an hour or so before bedtime. I take my dog out for a short evening walk." - Chelsey, 27

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