Domino's Airplane Pizza Delivery In The Caribbean Is Perfect For People With Serious Pepperoni Cravings

Imagine living in a place where you couldn't get pizza delivered — crazy, right? But it turns out that's exactly what residents and visitors on the tiny Caribbean islands of Saba and St. Eustatius have dealt with for years — until recently, thanks to Domino's pizza delivery by plane. That's right. Domino's finally decided to stop depriving those poor people of their slices, and agreed to begin pizza delivery to the small Caribbean destinations.

According to Yahoo! Travel, the pizza chain now gives both of these islands the option of having pizza delivered by a small plane from nearby St. Maarten. Pizza delivered by a plane? Those locals must have some serious pepperoni cravings — not that I can blame them.

If the idea sounds a little crazy, that's because it is. In fact, it apparently all started out as an April Fools' joke when a helicopter made a pizza delivery to the islands. But the residents of Saba and St. Eustatius ended up loving it so much that Domino's saw an opportunity and teamed up with airline Winair to make it a regular thing. The service launched earlier this month, and has reportedly already been a big hit, with several requests for deliveries coming in per day.

So how exactly does it work? Well, apparently customers can order from the Domino’s location at Princess Juliana International Airport, and an employee then just hops on a regularly scheduled flight with the pizza (talk about dedicated). The pies are made right before the flight, and it usually only takes about 15 to 20 minutes to get to the destination. Customers can then go pick up their finished orders at the airport.

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Oh, and customers don't even have to worry about paying some exorbitant delivery fee. The eatery charges only an extra $2.75 for the service, which seems like a small price to pay for finally getting the pizza you've been jonesing for. Pizza — it really does make the world go 'round.

Image: Pixabay