'Duck Dynasty' Family Justifies Phil Robertson's Anti-Gay Statements: Hey, The Bible Says It's Okay

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It's not surprising that the Duck Dynasty clan is sticking to its patriarch, following Phil Robertson's anti-gay comments that landed him in suspension at A&E. (Robertson compared homosexuality to bestiality in an interview with GQ, and claimed to not understand the concept, since "It seems like, to me, a vagina — as a man — would be more desirable than a man’s anus.") After all, the family that is intolerant together, stays together! What is surprising is that while the Duck Dynasty cast didn't quite second his comments, calling them "coarse," they essentially supported them, using everyone's favorite motel reading material as a defense. Said the  Duck Dynasty family in a statement released Thursday night:

Despite Robertson's words that "adulterers, the idolaters, the male prostitutes, the homosexual offenders, the greedy, the drunkards, the slanderers, the swindlers — they won't inherit the kingdom of God. Don't deceive yourself. It's not right," the family claims that the reality star preaches love.

Also, since the scandal took over media, Twitter, and, undoubtedly, dinner tables across the Midwest, a video clip hit the Web of Robertson making more homophobic statements. In a set of videos, reportedly filmed in 2010, the reality star purportedly claimed homosexuals were, among other things, "full of murder" and "liable to invent ways of doing evil."

Julia Ramirez on YouTube

But it's hardly the only thing Robertson expressed that is drawing criticism. The Atlantic also pointed out Robertson's words about African-Americans in the South, which have been buried in the anti-gay controversy. When talking about the Jim Crow South, Robertson claimed that, "I never, with my eyes, saw the mistreatment of any black person. Not once ... They’re singing and happy." As Atlantic writer Jonathan Merritt points out:

But, for fans of the hit A&E series (and, oh, there are many), the last section of the family's statement might hit the hardest. Because, without Robertson, is there Duck Dynasty at all?

But more worrisome than the idea that a reality star said terrible things (we've known for some time that many do just that) is the fact that Robertson's statements are inciting a culture war. Politicians and fans alike have head to Twitter to support Robertson, and condemn detractors, A&E, and, yes, homosexuals. And Duck Dynasty fans even jumpstarted a petition to reinstate Robertson on the series.

But, with all this talk about the Bible, really, what does God think about all this nonsense?

Amen.