Who Are The Democratic Debate Moderators? CBS News Journalists Will Host This Time

WASHINGTON - APRIL 27: John Dickerson, of Slate.com, speaks during a live taping of 'Meet the Press' April 27, 2008 in Washington, DC. Howard Dean, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, David Broder, of the Washington Post, John Dickerson, of Slate.com, Gwen Ifill, of PBS's 'Washington Week', Andrea Mitchell, of NBC News, and Richard Wolffe, of Newsweek magazine appeared on the show to speak about the upcoming 2008 US presidential elections. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images for Meet the Press)
Source: Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images News/Getty Images

The next Democratic debate is just around the corner and is set to be held on Saturday night at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. CBS, along with partners KCCI and The Des Moines Register, will be hosting the event. Three candidates will take the stage this time: Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, and Martin O'Malley. Representatives from all three outlets will be on hand to ask candidates questions as well as make sure that the debate goes smoothly. Who are the Democratic debate moderators?

Face The Nation host and CBS News journalist John Dickerson will assume the role of primary moderator. This marks the first of two debates that Dickerson will be heading, the second being a GOP debate scheduled for Feb. 13, 2016. He will be joined by his CBS colleague and congressional correspondent Nancy Cordes, who has been on the campaign trail covering myriad of candidates. Representing local CBS affiliate KCCI will be soon-to-retire anchor Kevin Cooney. Cooney announced his retirement in May and will officially step down as evening anchor at the end of this month. Having the opportunity to moderate yet another primary debate is surely an honor for the esteemed journalist, who's previously served as host of gubernatorial as well as national debates.

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Political columnist Kathie Obradovich will also join her fellow journalists as The Des Moines Register's representative during the debate. Obradovich previously noted that, as of late, there has been particular excitement on the left for the remaining three candidates. At the Jefferson-Jackson dinner in Des Moines, a pivotal Iowa Democratic fundraising event, she writes that enthusiasm is certainly not lacking in the Hawkeye State:

They [supporters] shouted, cheered, chanted, pounded their feet on bleachers. Clinton supporters waved footlong glow sticks that turned the cheering sections blue. Sanders supporters waved signs and twirled small glow sticks on strings. O’Malley’s cheering section was much smaller but did its best to compete.

The Saturday evening debate will undoubtedly bring similar enthusiasm to the Sheslow Auditorium at Drake University. With fewer debates on the Democratic side, the American people are eager to get a glimpse of candidates and hear what they have to say. CBS News' team of experienced reporters and moderators should hopefully make for a gripping debate that lacks the pitfalls seen in previous Republican match-ups. Additionally, a debate forum hosted by MSNBC's Rachel Maddow was held last Friday to give candidates even more opportunities to engage with the voting public.

This second debate may prove crucial and bring about follow-up questions, adding even more depth to a fairly close Democratic primary race in one of the most crucial states for elections.

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