Ben Carson’s Closing Statement At The Fourth GOP Debate Was Really Quite Morbid

MILWAUKEE, WI - NOVEMBER 10: Presidential candidate Ben Carson speaks during Republican Presidential Debate sponsored by Fox Business and the Wall Street Journal at the Milwaukee Theatre November 10, 2015 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The fourth Republican debate is held in two parts, one main debate for the top eight candidates, and another for four other candidates lower in the current polls. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Source: Scott Olson/Getty Images News/Getty Images

Although Ben Carson isn't the most engaging or charismatic debater, America had a close eye on him at the fourth GOP debate, since he surpassed Donald Trump for first place in the latest McClatchy/Marist poll, with 24 percent of support. In order to maintain his lead, the political outsider needed to prove himself Tuesday during the Fox Business Network debate in Milwaukee. After all, it focused on his weakest subject — the economy. But Carson's closing statement talked a lot about death, and not the economy.

Unlike the other Republican candidates new to politics, like Donald Trump and Carly Fiorina, Carson has no business experience. This had many people questioning his ability to create jobs, reform taxes, and grow the economy as a whole. He's talked about the importance of balancing the nation's budget, but given no specifics about how he would do that, and was highly criticized for his flat-rate tax plan, which was inspired by Biblical tithing. This debate was his chance to prove that he too can handle America's money. Like always, Carson remained calm and collected throughout the debate, but he tried very hard to assure voters of his economic know-how while dodging attacks about the alleged discrepancies in his biography.   

Here's what Carson said in his closing statement:

In the two hours of this debate, five people have died from drug-related deaths, $100 million has been added to our national debt, 200 babies have been killed by abortionists, and two veterans have taken their lives out of despair. This is a narrative that we can change. Not we the Democrats, not we the Republicans, but we the people of America, because there is something special about this nation and we must embrace it and be proud of it and never give it away for the sake of political correctness.

Though he ended with a rallying cry for patriotism and teamwork between the two parties, Carson's closing was overall pretty depressing. In his allotted 30 seconds, he packed in a lot of morbid statistics to highlight how badly America needs fixing, and he even managed to get in an anti-abortion comment, since Planned Parenthood wasn't brought up during the actual debate. 

Despite his seemingly good intentions, Carson's death-focused closing just left everyone feeling disheartened. 

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