Leah Remini Reportedly Quits Scientology. Here Are 7 Other Stars Who Dissed the Religion

After being involved in Scientology for 12 years, King of Queens actress Leah Remini is leaving the religion. According to reports, the actress was subjected to "thought modification" and intense interrogations by the leaders of the church after she asked Scientology leader Tom Miscavige a question that was "out of her rank." But Remini isn't the only celebrity to eschew the religion — many celebrities have refused to partake in drinking the Scientology Kool-Aid. Read on to see stars who dissed the religion.

Leah Remini Leaves Scientology... What Other Stars Spoke Out Against it?

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After being involved in Scientology for 12 years, King of Queens actress Leah Remini is leaving the religion. According to reports, the actress was subjected to "thought modification" and intense interrogations by the leaders of the church after she asked Scientology leader Tom Miscavige a question that was "out of her rank." But Remini isn't the only celebrity to eschew the religion — many celebrities have refused to partake in drinking the Scientology Kool-Aid. Read on to see stars who dissed the religion.

Paul Haggis

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The Crash director was a member of the Church of Scientology for 35 years, but couldn't take the religion's stance on gay rights after California banned gay marriage in 2009. "I could not, in good conscience, be a member of an organization where gay-bashing was tolerated," Haggis wrote in a letter about his departure from Scientology. "Silence is consent, and I refuse to consent."

Elvis Presley

According to the biography Elvis Aaron Presley: Revelations from the Memphis Mafia, associates of Presley claimed that he hated the religion, saying that "all they want is money." Interestingly, his daughter, Lisa Marie, became a prominent member later in her life.

Brooke Shields

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Shields was publicly criticized by celebrity Scientologist Tom Cruise after she reported that the drug Paxil helped her overcome her postpartum depression. Her response to the critics? That Scientology should "stick to fighting aliens." See, Shields really would be perfect for that spot on The View.

Trey Parker and Matt Stone

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The guys who brought us South Park and The Book of Mormon don't exactly shy away from controversy. The comedy team created a South Park episode, "Trapped in the Closet," dedicated to the mockery of Tom Cruise and Scientology. While fans of the show consider it one of the best episodes of the series, Cruise was outraged by his portrayal... exactly what Parker and Stone hoped to achieve.

Jason Beghe

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Chicago Fire actor Jason Beghe was involved in Scientology from 1994 to 2007. Though he was once considered a "poster boy" for the organization, it didn't take too long before Beghe realized that there was something a bit nutty about the group. After leaving the religion, he conducted several filmed interviews on the subject, saying that Scientology is "very dangerous for your spiritual, psychological, mental, emotional health and evolution."

Dr. Drew

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Scientologists are known opponents of modern medical treatments, so it's not surprising that internist and addiction specialist Dr. Drew finds the group to be a total scam. Dr. Drew believes that those involved in Scientology are probably suffering from something deeper than a desire for religion, even calling out one of the biggest celebrity members, Tom Cruise. "Take a guy like Tom Cruise. Why would somebody be drawn into a cultish kind of environment like Scientology? To me, that’s a function of a very deep emptiness and suggests serious neglect in childhood.”

Steve Martin

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Sometimes satire is the best way to take a jab at something as huge as Scientology. Steve Martin parodied Scientology in his film Bowfinger, a film which he both wrote and starred in. In the film, Eddie Murphy's Tom Cruise-like character is controlled by his connection with psuedo-religious organization "Mind Head." While Martin claims that those parts of the film weren't necessarily based on Scientology, we think that his denial may have more to do with the overwhelming influence that the group has on Hollywood. Watch this and see for yourself.