Did Donald Trump Use Fake Names To Brag About Himself To Reporters? Here Are The Claims

Donald Trump has a pretty distinct voice — so much so that most Americans could probably pick it out of a blind sample. So, it's a little hard to believe the presumptive GOP nominee Trump allegedly used to pretend to be a spokesperson for himself when speaking to reporters, going by the names "John Miller" and "John Barron." Taking on a new persona in order to brag about yourself to others is extremely vain. Trump, of course, denies these claims.

The Washington Post obtained tapes of calls made from Trump's New York office in the '70s, '80s, and '90s with Miller or Barron, people who journalists and multiple Trump aides claim were Trump himself. He even testified in 1990 that he sometimes used the name John Miller for himself, though he denied that the newly resurfaced tapes are him.

When People magazine reporter Sue Carswell requested an interview with Trump in 1991, a publicist for the real estate mogul — Miller — called back, giving her a very detailed account of why Trump left Marla Maples for the Italian model Carla Bruni. "He really didn’t want to make a commitment," Miller said. "He’s coming out of a marriage, and he’s starting to do tremendously well financially." Miller continued: "He’s a good guy, and he’s not going to hurt anybody ... He treated his wife well and ... he will treat Marla well."

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Miller and Barron were usually good about referring to Trump in the third person, but slipped up in the conversation with Carswell when talking about Bruni. "I think it’s somebody that — you know, she’s beautiful. I saw her once, quickly, and beautiful," Miller said, sounding even more like Trump.

Miller was also not shy about explaining that many women were sexually drawn to Trump. "Actresses just call to see if they can go out with him and things," Miller told Carswell, adding that Madonna "wanted to go out with him" and that he had three other girlfriends while living with Maples.

In a phone interview with the Today show Friday, Trump continued to deny the claims after the tape of the Carswell interview was played. "No, I don’t think it — I don’t know anything about it. You’re telling me about it for the first time and it doesn’t sound like my voice at all," he said. "I have many, many people that are trying to imitate my voice and then you can imagine that, and this sounds like one of the scams, one of the many scams — doesn’t sound like me."

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Angela Merkel would definitely lose trust in the United States if she found out the president was lying to her about his identity over the phone, as would most respected leaders.