How Many Delegates Did Hillary Clinton Win In Washington, D.C.? She's Taking Them All The Way To A Nomination

PITTSBURGH, PA - JUNE 14: Presumptive Democratic nominee for president Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters at the International Brotherhood of Electric Workers Hall on Tuesday, June 14, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In the wake of the shooting in Orlando, Florida, Clinton is campaigning in Ohio and Pennsylvania to present her vision for a stronger and safer America. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
Source: Jeff Swensen/Getty Images News/Getty Images

Tuesday, June 14 marked the final Democratic contest of the 2016 Presidential primaries. As the DC primary results poured in throughout Tuesday night, this year's Democratic candidates had their final shot at winning a few more delegates to end their run before the July convention. So, at the end of the day, how many delegates did Hillary Clinton win in DC

DC has a small pool of delegates at stake for the Democrats. The District has just 20 pledged delegates, 13 of which are allocated proportionally based on how the municipal districts vote, and the final seven are distributed based on the district-wide vote. By the end of Tuesday's primary, Clinton secured 16 of DC's delegates, ultimately winning the last Democratic primary of the season. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders took 4 delegates, although they don't mean too much for his campaign at this point. 

Clinton now holds 2,219 total delegates, which she has won over the last few months of primary contests, though not without a fight from the Vermont Senator. She will likely now win her spot as the Democratic nominee, after naming herself as such last week. However, Sanders has said he would still not drop out of the race until the convention, even with his 1,832 total delegates. 

The only chance Sanders has left to win a spot on the Democratic ticket this fall will be at the Democratic National Convention from July 25-28 in Philadelphia. However, taking his campaign to the convention will not likely change the outcome of the race, as Sanders would have to convince a majority of Clinton's superdelegates to change their votes in favor of Sanders. They are not likely to do so, considering that Clinton has also won the popular vote.

Maybe Sanders' supporters should start accepting Clinton's nomination after her Washington, D.C. win, you know, now that the primaries are finally over.

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