This Hillary Clinton Line About Being Blamed For Everything Pinpoints One Of This Election's Biggest Problems

(L-R) Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton shake hands prior to the start of the Presidential Debate at Hofstra University on September 26, 2016 in Hempstead, New York. The first of four debates for the 2016 Election, three Presidential and one Vice Presidential, is moderated by NBC's Lester Holt.
Source: Drew Angerer/Getty Images News/Getty Images

Monday's debate got off to a heated start almost immediately as GOP nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton really went at it at the debate. And this one exchange basically summarizes the whole election thus far: Trump called Clinton out for essentially everything wrong with the world and Clinton responded, "I have a feeling I'm going to be blamed for everything that's ever happened," to which Trump asked, "Why not?" 

Clinton got the last word though and won the 2016 jab-of-the-year award with her response. Laughing, she said, "Just join the debate by saying more crazy things." I guess we all got our answer to the question of which Trump would be attending and participating in Monday's debate. But at the end of the day, there's really only one Trump, anyway. Did anyone actually expect him to "stick to the message"?  

The two candidates got right down to business almost immediately in what became a seriously heated debate. But Trump suggesting that Clinton might as well take the blame for everything that's ever happened speaks to his problematic campaign that has largely focused on unsubstantiated insults rather than detailed proposals and policies. 

[Twitter Embed: https://twitter.com/usatoday2016/status/780579865800179713]

Over the course of Monday night's debate, Trump pointed the finger at Clinton various times, suggesting she was to blame for the recession, for ISIS, and NAFTA. Sure, there are valid critiques of Clinton's political career, but Trump's delivery is flawed and lacks in evidence. He noted, "But we have no leadership, and honestly, that starts with Secretary Clinton." On ISIS, Trump suggested that Clinton had been "fighting ISIS [her] entire adult life" (not even close to true). And he also claimed that on NAFTA, "she's been doing this for 30 years and why hasn't she made the agreements better?" 

Trump may have been more believable had he substantiated his claims with actual examples. But based on Monday's debate, and Trump's performance, it would seem that Clinton has the whole world on her shoulders and that she is somehow to blame for every single flawed policy the federal government has passed over the years? Hmm.

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