How The Kim Kardashian Robbers Can Sell Her Stolen Jewelry & Get Away With It

While the most important thing to come out of Kim Kardashian's robbery is the knowledge that she is ultimately OK and that she was "physically unharmed," that still doesn't mean her robbery wasn't damaging. Sure, the loss of items, regardless of value, is nothing when it comes to safety, but it's still a loss and a violation nonetheless. A violation that is looking more and more like it was carefully calculated, if CNN's assessment is correct. And according to the news site, because of that, the robbers who stole Kardashian's jewelry could sell it and be able to get away with the crime.

I know what you're thinking: How can they possibly get away with a crime so highly publicized and extensively documented? It's the year 2016, there's cameras everywhere! There's always some sort of internet or paper trail! Well, that's true, and the gem specialist who CNN spoke with said as much. On the bright side, if the thieves don't get away with it, it's because Kardashian's long talked about fame and overexposure is actually on her side. According to SaferGem's intelligence officer, Lee Henderson, who spoke with CNN, her fame will make selling the stolen jewels "much more difficult." But, of course, that is not a guarantee that they won't be able to.

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CNN explains that one way the thieves could potentially get away with nabbing her "ring valued at $4.5 million" is because it will "likely" be "broken into smaller stones and sold. Its band could be melted down." More specifically, Henderson explained to CNN that, if anything, the ring will be broken down because "Otherwise it will be very difficult to sell. Nobody will want to handle it." Per the news source, the robbers could have found a "handler" in advance or that jewels could have been "stolen on order" because offloading the jewelry fast would mean selling the pieces for a fraction of what they are actually worth.

But despite the disconcerting scenarios, the thieves' success is not a given. Billboard presents a much more optimistic view. DuMouchelle International Auctioneers & Appraisers' Joseph DuMouchelle explained to the source that the jewels are "so famous and identifiable from a gemological perspective, it will be almost impossible to sell them." He continued,

"Even if the thieves had the stones slightly recut to alter their appearance and submitted them to a lab for a certificate, they would be identifiable as Kardashian's diamonds. Gems that big and rare have individual characteristics you don’t see in two stones. Even if the diamonds resurface 10 or 20 years from now, those stones are going to be very recognizable. It’s a very small world of dealers and clients in the market for stones like those."

Time will tell if Kardashian's jewels will ever be located, but it sounds like the rarity of them could really make it a possibility.