How Many Electors Did Hillary Clinton Get? Donald Trump Outpaced The First Female Nominee

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 04: Congressional clerks pass the Electoral College certificate from the state of Ohio while unsealing and organizing all the votes from the 50 states in the House of Representatives chamber at the U.S. Capitol January 4, 2013 in Washington, DC. The votes were tallied during a joint session of the 113th Congress. President Barack Obama and Biden received 332 votes to be reelected. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Source: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images News/Getty Images

More than 18 months after announcing her candidacy, Hillary Clinton's long journey back to the White House is finally over. A grueling campaign and hard-fought battle against an insurgent opponent culminated in less electoral votes at the polls for Clinton than expected, which will correlate to an official number of electors in a few weeks' time. Thankfully, you don't really have to wait that long to find out. How many electors did Clinton get? She ended Election Day with less electors than her opponent, losing the Electoral College and therefore the presidency. 

Clinton won three swing states to Trump's six, adding up to approximately 228 electoral votes and over 59,000,000 popular votes. The Electoral College members won't actually vote until the Monday following the second Wednesday of December, so technically, the country won't know exactly how many electors Clinton got until then. Plus, the results aren't considered official until they're certified by the President of the Senate (a.k.a. the vice president a.k.a. Joe Biden), which doesn't happen until the first week of January

However, due to faithless elector laws and the overwhelming precedent for electors to vote how their state voted, the current estimate is likely very close to where the final figure will be.

That figure is pretty low compared to to where experts thought it would be. One week before the election, 270ToWin.com's Pundit Consensus Map showed Clinton with a comfortable win over her opponent Donald Trump, with 307 safe, likely, or leaning electoral votes to Trump's 179. The few votes that were left undecided on that map were Arizona, Iowa, North Carolina, Ohio, and one each in Nebraska and Maine's split system. Those final toss-ups, which, with the exception of Ohio, are typically safe bets for Republicans, but this wacky election cycle changed a lot of rules about what to expect.

This election cycle was unique and painful beyond words, but let's not forget the vast importance of Clinton's feminist achievement. She has completely rewritten history here as one of the only women to receive a presidential electoral vote and certainly the only one to ever have had this decent a shot at the presidency. .

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