'Girls' Star Lena Dunham Talks Season 2's 4 Most Controversial Moments

NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 17: Filmmaker Lena Dunham attends the 65th annual Writers Guild East Coast Awards at B.B. King Blues Club & Grill on February 17, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images)
Source: Neilson Barnard/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

I'll say it on record: Like many other twentysomethings, I worship Lena Dunham. While I don't always agree with the choices she makes regarding the direction of her Emmy-winning show Girls (um, that scene with Adam?), it would be difficult for any young female to not relate to her work. And, recently, Glenn Whip of the Los Angeles Times gave us a glimpse into Dunham and Season 2's most controversial moments. Could she explain Adam? (Can anyone explain Adam?) Read on to find out. 

How Will the Show Cope Without Charlie?

Season 2 was basically the Year of Charlie. Seemingly overnight, the character (played by Christopher Abbott) went from playing in a garage band to being the hottest new app creator in New York. But while Charlie got everything together, his ex-girlfriend Marnie (Allison Williams) was falling apart and did everything to get her old boyfriend back. It wasn't until the Season 2 finale that Marnie and Charlie finally recognized they belonged together. They were back on, and totally solid — until Abbott chose not to return for Season 3 of the series. Fans were troubled. What would Girls be without, well, one of its boys? Dunham, however, has your answer, and it's kind of brilliant: If the show Girls relied on guys, we'd be up a creek without a paddle. Don't worry. I've tried to come up with an emotionally honest version of the end of that relationship.” Let's hope it doesn't involve Charlie leaving Marnie for the uber-hipster, artisinal-mustard-selling Audrey, though.

So... Just How Crazy is Adam?

At the end of Season 2, Adam is seen saving Hannah from an OCD breakdown — but it's hard to cope with the image of Adam as the dark knight of Girls. His sexual behavior has often been called into question on the show, mainly because he seems to enjoy degrading his sexual partners. When Adam told his girlfriend Natalie to “get on all fours” — despite her telling him she wasn't super comfortable with it — many accused Adam of rape. How did Dunham feel about the scene? “I don't think Adam is a villain. If he thought he had even touched the R-word, he would be unable to live. To me, it seemed like a terrible miscommunication between two people who didn't know what they really wanted.” Maybe, but should we really be glorifying Adam as the male hero of the show when he's constantly crossing the line with women?

Is Hannah Hot Enough for Joshua?

Forget Adam's shocking scene — other viewers felt more offended that Hannah could hook-up with Joshua, a doctor played by dreamboat Patrick Wilson. And if we were offended by these comments, imagine how Dunham felt. “I get so tired of having to cry out "misogyny," but that's what's going on in this situation. People questioning the idea that a woman could sleep with a man who defied her lot in the looks bracket hews so closely to these really outdated ideas about what makes a woman worth spending time with. Really?”

How "Happy" Was the Ending?

“People are always complaining that there are no wins for the characters. Well, we had an episode of super-wins!” But for some, including myself, Season 2 finale was a series of letdowns. Adam and Hannah back together? Please. We wanted to see Hannah and Marnie back together. Unfortunately, we didn't get any reconciliation for the friendships that made Girls so likeable in Season 1. Don't get me wrong — I'm a sucker for a romantic ending. But let's make Season 3 of Girls about the girls, okay?

Image: Getty Images

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