Why Does Asparagus Make Your Pee Smell? And Other Weird Food Questions Answered

ASCOT, ENGLAND - JUNE 20: (EDITORS NOTE: This image was processed using digital filters) Asparagus wait to be prepared in the general kitchen during day four of Royal Ascot at Ascot Racecourse on June 20, 2014 in Ascot, England. (Photo by Miles Willis/Getty Images for Ascot Racecourse)
Source: Miles Willis/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

Ever eat a lovely meal of spring vegetables only to wonder later why your pee smells like asparagus? Don't worry, we've all been there. There's nothing wrong with you — the aroma is due to the chemical makeup of the crunchy green veggie.

To help us understand the chemical structure behind certain foods, like our friend the asparagus, Compound Interest formulated 11 awesome infographics that illustrate why certain edible items have particular effects on our bodies. One such infographic explains that the levels of the compounds methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide are a thousand times greater in urine after consuming asparagus. Thanks to chemistry, you can now rest easy that you're not a freak.

Other foods broken down by their compounds include onions, chocolate and beetroots, as seen below:










Who would have known that nutmeg is actually an hallucinogenic when consumed in large doses? I'll be sure to keep that in mind the next time I bake. I also now understand that a compound in grapefruit prevents medication from breaking down, hence the "grapefruit juice effect." Science never fails to amaze me. 

For more awesome knowledge on the science of our world, bodies and much more, check out Compound Interest. You may even figure out why your feet smell so bad ... yuck.

Images: Compound Interest


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