My Problem with #Oomf and Online Anonymity

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One of the most ubiquitous hashtags in the Twittersphere is #oomf. The acronym stands for "one of my followers", and is often employed to send subliminal messages or "subtweets". There's even an entire account dedicated to the trend, @OhDearOOMF. Check out some gems from the account below:

Precious, right? But then the tweets begin to get a little unstable...

And then just downright aggressive...

OK, honestly, if you're at this point, an intervention is seriously needed.

I have no problem with users casually joking about one of their followers using the hashtag. It can be employed as playful banter between friends and acquaintances. However, the problem arises when people hide behind anonymizing phrases like "#oomf" in order to vent without fear of confrontation or repercussions. Come on. If it's an innocent crush, you should proudly own that as a 20-something adult. Likewise, if it's downright hatred, you should have the gall to speak your mind without the crutch of a lexical scapegoat. Honestly, if you can't stand firmly in your feelings, should you even be tweeting it?