There's A "Snapchat Drug" In Australia, But Of Course The "Facebook Drug" Got Here First

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A new drug has hit the streets of Darwin, Australia, and it's imprinted with the logo of a certain infamous photo-sharing app, earning it the moniker "the Snapchat drug." While Snapchat has nothing to do with the drug, believed to be ecstasy-based, the makers probably appropriated the image to attract teenagers and early 20-somethings. Using Snapchat to sext nude selfies is already pretty dumb, but using Snapchat to promote an illegal drug is, well, a terrible idea.

On Thursday, at least four people who took the drug were rushed to the Royal Darwin Hospital. The Northern Territory Police, Fire and Emergency Services issued a statement about the "Snapchat drug," warning people of the new drug and describing the effects they witnessed.

These people appeared to become aggressive and disoriented after ingesting the drug and were taken to Royal Darwin Hospital. The drug is described to be in pill form and has been sold in two colors. One is pink and the other blue with green speckles.

Though there's little information available about the drug, it is believed to be ecstasy-based. "I have seen two full-grown, heavy-set men taken to hospital last night due to ingesting these," one person told the Daily Telegraph . "I know for a fact that a lot of these have been sold throughout Darwin [the capital of Australia’s Northern Territory]."

The Snapchat drug isn't the first ecstasy-based pill to feature social media or tech-inspired imagery. Apparently, these sites, which are well known and used by millions of young people all over the world, are inspiring a whole crop of new drugs. Get to know some of them...

Bitcoin Drug

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These yellow pills featured the digital currency's logo, which one user on the illegal drug review site PillReports.com called a "good-looking pill."

There isn't much information about the Bitcoin drug, so we'll let this user describe the effects of taking one of these so-called "double-dose" pills: "I was absolutely bouncing. Was in a club by this time and the feeling was just incredible. Found myself talking absolute nonsense and dancing like there was no tomorrow."

He then says, "Only my 10th time rolling so I wouldn't say I was an experienced user." That's where you're wrong, buddy. Ten times does an experienced user make, methinks.

Twitter Drug

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These round pills feature the blue Twitter bird, and did not receive rave reviews on PillReports.com.

While the reason should have been because this drug is ecstasy and can cause long-term emotional, psychological, and cognitive problems, the reviewer suggested "avoiding these like the plague" because he or she felt they were a "waste of money, and waste of a night."

Facebook Drug

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Yup, if Snapchat is being used to market a drug, you can bet that Facebook was used first.

According to PillReports.com, the Facebook pills are round and come in red and pink (what, no Facebook blue?) According to one review, the user "started to come up, music enhanced, started getting chatty, pupils went huge." Overall, the user recommends it. I don't know what's more terrifying, the fact that people are taking ecstasy or the fact that they're reviewing them and recommending them online like it's Yelp for drugs.