The BatKid Documentary Is Looking For Serious Cash But Do We Really Need a Film About Miles Scott?

I remember November 15 of 2013 so clearly. The sky was cloudy, the air was way too chilly, my hot chocolate burned my tongue, and Batkid saved humanity. That was the day that I got zero work done because I was glued to my computer screen watching every heart-warming step that Miles Scott A.K.A. Batkid took along the streets of San Francisco. I, along with viewers across America, watched (and cried ) as a little boy with leukemia realized his dream. Because how freakin' cool is it that thousands of people came together to make a random boy's dream come true? So cool.

Five months later, and now filmmaker Dana Nachman is looking for $100,000 via Indiegogo to fund Batkid Begins , a documentary that explores how Batkid became a phenomenon in San Francisco and worldwide. Here's the thing: Do we really need that film? I'm a person who gave a friend a framed photo of BatKid for Christmas, and even I don't think this is the best use of money. I'm in full support of everything that the Make-A-Wish Foundation and thousands of good samaritans did to make that little boy smile, and if I had been in San Francisco that day, I would have joined in the festivities. But making a documentary of the event makes me feel like the special moment in history is being capitalized on, especially when Nachman is asking for $100,000 and it cost San Francisco $105,000 to pay for Batkid's adventure. Wouldn't it be so much better if we raised $100,000 to make another child's dream come true?

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But in the end, because I consider myself to be a person with some type of heart, I hope the film gets what it needs and that people enjoy their BatKid "perks" for donating — I know I'd like a Batkid T-shirt, mug, or cape — because there's nothing wrong with a reminder of how awesome the world can be. Plus, there's a guy asking for money for potato salad, so obviously Batkid Begins isn't the worst thing you could spend your money on.