Poll Finds Both Women and Men Think You're Being Rude

STAMFORD, CT - MARCH 25: A girl plays on her phone as her Ecuadorian parents, fearing possible deporation, get legal services on March 25, 2017 in Stamford, Connecticut. The non-profit Building One Community has a waiting list for immigrant parents seeking legal advice and assistance. In addition to legal services, the immigrant center offers free 'Me Preparo' workshops, designed to teach immigrants how to get their financial affairs in order in case they are deported and separated from their U.S.-born children. The Trump Administration has promised to deport millions of undocumented immigrants living in the United States. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Source: John Moore/Getty Images News/Getty Images

A new poll conducted by Microsoft finds that despite being totally different sexes within the same species, both men and women think poor phone etiquette is annoying. 

Here were the top five pet peeves:

1. Checking phones constantly

2. Talking loudly

3. Using or not silencing phones when appropriate

4. Using phones during face-to-face conversation

5. Delaying traffic by using phones

There were some differences between men and women when it came to the way we (report) using mobile technology. Men, on average, were two percent better at keeping their phones password-protected, and thirty-two percent of men remember to keep their apps/software regularly updated, compared to twenty-four percent of women. But that's pretty much where men stop pulling ahead when it comes to online security. Microsoft's press release breaks it down:

"Yet men seem to experience more mobile pitfalls, receiving more emails from strangers asking for personal information (70 percent versus 65 percent), more rogue antivirus popups (66 percent versus 58 percent), and more online impersonation experiences (31 percent versus 26 percent).

Women tend to be more protective of their online reputations, taking additional steps to limit personal information online (40 percent versus 37 percent) and what strangers can see on social networking sites (40 percent versus 32 percent), as well as being more selective about what they text (34 percent versus 31 percent)."

Oh, men. Always replying to those Nigeria business scams, am I right? Now if you'll excuse me, I have to go update 20 apps. 

Image: Getty Images

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