Photos Of Tornado Damage In Oklahoma & Arkansas Show The Twisters Were Devastating

After a relatively calm month, tornado season has quickly kicked in. Multiple tornadoes ripped through Oklahoma and Arkansas on Wednesday evening, leaving one person dead, several injured, and tens of thousands of residents without power. Residents said they were prepared for natural disaster after facing a much deadlier tornado two years ago. However, as officials continue to assess the extent of the damage, pictures show that the latest tornadoes were pretty devastating nonetheless.

One of the most damaged areas was the River Oaks Mobile Home Park in Sand Springs, a suburb of Tulsa. Tulsa County Sheriff's Capt. Billy McKelvey told the Associated Press that one person was killed when his mobile home collapsed. At least nine people sustained injuries stemming from the tornado, Oklahoma Department of Emergency Services spokeswoman Keli Cain told the AP.

On Wednesday night, there were roughly 80,000 reported power outages, which went down to 20,000 the following morning. On Thursday afternoon, Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin declared a state of emergency for the 25 counties that were hit hardest.

Another tornado was reported on Wednesday night in Moore, Oklahoma, which Moore Mayor Glenn Lewis described to the AP as "kind of like a junior tornado for us." Two years ago, an EF5 tornado tore through Moore, killing 24 people and devastating the town. "We've been down this road before," Governor Fallin told the outlet. "We know what to do."

Another tornado was sighted in Arkansas, but no injuries were reported there.

Tornado season typically runs from March through June, but before Wednesday night, the U.S. hadn't seen one in more than a month. Before the tornadoes formed on Wednesday, Greg Carbin, warning coordination meteorologist for the Storm Prediction Center, gave this ominous notice:

This will be the 'tornado' that breaks the drought for March.

Take a look at photos of the damage caused by Wednesday's tornado.

Image: NOAA Photo Library/Flickr