Kanye West Pens 'Paper Mag' Essay & Here's The 12 Most Salacious Bits, From Racism to Kilts

Kanye West has made less of a splash than his wife did with a Paper Mag cover. I think that, cover-wise, he got a raw deal. It's so dark and brooding, like nearly every other picture that has ever been taken of Kanye. It's not going to break the internet. However, while the cover was spectacular, Kim didn't have all that much to say in the interview. Kanye penned an essay for Paper Mag for his turn, and it's fascinating.

Kanye is incredibly good at soundbites; it's one of the reasons he's such a talented rapper, and also why he ends up facing a lot of ridicule. I think that media outlets don't give him enough credit when he's being tongue-in-cheek (perhaps because the moody scowl that accompanies the interviews seems incapable of playfulness), as well as taking the soundbites out of the context of what is often a far longer and more nuanced argument.

I don't agree with (or at least fully follow) everything he says in this interview. He seems to worship at the temple that is Apple (and Steve Jobs). He argues that corporations are bad, but money is good, which seems like a false separation. I am far less hopeful than he is about the equalizing effects of the internet on new generations. However, Kanye had some beautiful things to say about artistic mediums, fatherhood, and beauty, as well as some hilarious quips. While I recommend reading the whole thing, here are some of the highlights.

On The Internet

There's a lot of people who want to make sure things don't become a hybrid, but the Internet has opened up every conversation, literally and metaphorically. It starts as homogenizing, but this hybrid-ing, this interbreeding of ideas, is necessary for us as a race to evolve.

On Mentoring

I think it's so important for me, as an artist, to give Drake as much information as I can, A$AP, Kendrick, Taylor Swift, any of these younger artists as much information as I can to make better music in the future.

On The Gap

It's funny that I worked at the Gap in high school, because in my past 15 years it seems like that's the place I stood in my creative path — to be the gap, the bridge.

On Fashion

I believe that everyone is a fashion insider, because it's illegal to be naked.

On Kilts

When I saw this kilt, I liked it. I was into it. It looked fresh to me. I felt creative; I didn't feel limited by some perception.

On What's To Come

I haven't even given my College Dropout of clothing yet. We're still on mixtapes.

On What Gets Him Off

Sometimes I can take something that's there and attempt to make a better version and that's what gets me off. Bottom line.

On Branding

We don't run anything; we're celebrities. We're the face of brands. We have to compromise what we say in lyrics so we don't lose money on a contract.

On Fatherhood

When I look in North's eyes, I'm happy about every mistake I've ever made. I'm happy that I fought to bring some type of reality to this world we choose to stay in right now, driven by brands and corporations.

On Racism

Racism is something that's taught, but for the new post-Internet, post-iPad kids that have been taught to swipe before they read, it's just not going to affect them as much. They realize that we are one race.

On Current Events & Social Media

People have asked why I don't speak out — on social media, for example — about events in this country. The way I see it, it's not about a post on social media from me when there are people dying.

On Outbursts

The times that I've looked like a crazy person — when I was screaming at an interviewer or screaming from the stage — all I was screaming was, "Help me to help more! I've given all I've got. I've gone into fucking debt. It's all I've got to give. But if I had a little bit more opportunity, I could give so much more.

Images: Giphy (12)