Dyslexic Person's Reading Experience Simulated in Sam Barclay's Book

Perhaps you, like me, know someone who's dyslexic. As a child, and still today, it's hard for me to understand the obstacles the dyslexic must overcome to read — a function which, for me, feels so natural, so much so that it's second only to breathing, even. But a beautiful book designed by Brit Sam Barclay, who has dyslexia, could bring the non-dyslexic a little closer to comprehension. This is, in fact, its primary goal; the work seeks to convey the condition's difficulties to a world largely unaffected, and therefore ignorant of them. "Great effort has been made to provide tools aimed at improving a persons reading but very little has been done to give those around them an understanding of what it really feels like to struggle in such a way," Barclay writes in his pitch on Kickstarter.com. Click on if you'd like to get a taste of what it like to read with dyslexia.

Book Simulates Dyslexia

Barclay strives for a "beautiful, design-led experience of what it feels like to struggle with reading."

Book Simulates Dyslexia

For years Barclay struggled with reading as well-intentioned people attempted, so he decided to combine his interest in typography with the latest research on the experience of dyslexia to create this book.

Book Simulates Dyslexia

The book, therefore, is both visually stunning and highly educational. This page, for example, demonstrates the color confusion some people with reading disabilities experience.

Book Simulates Dyslexia

Though dyslexia presented hurdles in his path to academic success, Barclay recently graduated from with a first-class degree.

Book Simulates Dyslexia

Though the project's fundraising period doesn't end until Nov. 28, donations to Barclay's project have already met, and far surpassed, his 14,500 pound funding goal to pay for the book's creation, distribution and licensing.

Book Simulates Dyslexia

Barclay's ultimate hope for the group? On his Kickstarter page he writes: "If those around [the dyslexic] — be it their teachers, parents or fellow students — can begin to understand what it feels like for them to be face to face with a page of text, the positive impact on their self esteem will be felt for the rest of their lives."