This Guy's Parody Of Every Inspirational Video Is Somehow More Inspiring Than All Of Them Combined — VIDEO

Have you ever seen someone share/like/comment on an "inspirational" video in one of your various social media news feeds and cringed into yourself so hard you almost inverted and exploded your whole self out your butt? No? Well you've never truly lived, nor known the incredulous rage of finding Internet activism absolutely obnoxious. Luckily, even though my butt explosion analogy isn't the most articulate, Peter Gilroy and YouTube channel Nacho Punch have made an incredibly eloquent parody of every inspirational video that ever graced the Internet. Because even though someone's heart is in the "right place" when they repost an inspirational video, taking three seconds out of one's day to make a fleeting cursory nod to a social issue is not a real investment in creating change. It's token.

It wouldn't hurt us all to once in a while step away from the screen and do something real to show that we're good people. It can be something as simple as giving up a seat on the subway or recycling. Or if you have the time and want to be a really, really good person, you can volunteer. Or if you don't have time but you still want to do something good, donate money or other needed resources to people who are volunteering. You know, do things that actually help people. "Likes" do not give anything tangible back. The parody video points out how vacuous inspirational video shares are, and it's in the form of a slam poem, which sucks when the format is being used seriously, and is perfectly on point for this satire.

You can watch the parody video here:

The STATION by MAKER on YouTube

Some of the best points it brings up are:

1. People will blindly endorse a rousing inspirational video even if the video doesn't really have a point

2. Marginalized social groups are often used as buzzwords/trends for Internet activists to get behind

3. That people will like/share/preach without having any actual information or trying to learn anything more about an issue

4. That Internet "likes" are meaningless, but have distracted a lot of people from actual life

Photos: YouTube; Giphy (5)