How Do You Fix Broken Eyeshadow? The Fixy Makeup Repair Kit Makes Cracked Shadows Better Than Brand New

If you've ever dropped an eyeshadow, cracked a blush, or damaged other assorted powder makeup products, you know they are usually rendered unusable at that point. However, the Fixy Makeup Repair Kit is the ultimate hack that allows you to fix busted eyeshadows and beyond.

Technically, it's not a hack. Rather, it's a device that helps you "Humpty Dumpty" your crushed, crumpled, clumped, and chunky powder product and return it to a smooth, soft, easy-to-apply, and flat finish. You literally put it back together again.

The brilliant and easy Fixy is also neater and cleaner than trying to DIY it.

The user-friendly kit takes all of three minutes to re-assemble a cracked compact or pan of product. It's affordable at $48 and can be used for coverup and bronzers, too! The multi-piece kit is refillable and self-contained, so it's easy to store. It's your makeup BFF — taking powder products from pulverized to pressed.

I put the Fixy, which comes in a millennial pink shade, to the test. I must admit that I was a tad skeptical at first. It seemed like a lot of steps and tools. I thought, "Is this really worth it? Wouldn't it be easier to toss the broke ass makeup and buy another?

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Then I remembered how maddening it is when you drop a pricy product that still had plenty of uses remaining. Once I got the hang of it, the Fixy was actually... fun.

I wanted to smash a shadow simply so I could put it back together again. I felt like a faux scientist — and I liked it.

Courtesy of Amy Sciarretto

My experiment is about to begin.

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Here's what's inside.

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The packaging also acts as instructions.

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Bunk makeup goes from A to B.

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These are all the tools needed to create makeup magic.

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Alchemy ahead!

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Oops! I did it again. Before Fixy, this eyeshadow would have been a lost cause.

1. Scrape & Sift

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I used the enclosed scraper to dump the eyeshadow chunks into the blending box, with boasts a strainer.

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It was sorta like sifting flour — ooh, a makeup bakery.

2. Grind

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The flat grinding tool helps transform the shadow chunks into fine dust while pushing it through the strainer holes.

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The result is a finely milled dust.

3. Fill The Pan

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Next, I chose a circular pan based on the size of the product I was fixing. I placed the pan into the appropriate mold and poured the powder I just ground into said pan.

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This part is important. Do not lift the mold — E-V-E-R! Instead, I used the tools to sweep any fallout into the pan. You can and will make a mess and that's more than OK. I surely did. I had to make sure the mold stayed put — or this would all have been for naught. That's because the ground powder is still loose in the mold at this point.

4. Spritz & Bind

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Here is where the fun and the magic happen. I spritzed the enclosed and all-natural Fixy Binding Spray — think of it like the spray you use to set your makeup — onto the face of the powder while holding the bottle five inches away. How many pumps are needed is determined by pan size and is written on the bottle for ease of use. Seriously, though! This kit is foolproof.

5. Press

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This is the press which "sets" the spritzed powder. The knob sizes correspond to those of the pans.

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I lined up the knob that matched the pan size, inserted it, and pressed down hard for 10 seconds.

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Voila! Well, not really. I didn't use enough spray. You're supposed to make the product damp, not saturated or soaking wet. I was too judicious. Since I didn't achieve a totally flat surface, I added another blast of the spray and pressed again.

6. Repeat

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The second press and additional binding spray lead to a marked improvement.

7. Eject & Set

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I allowed the "new" product to stand for 20 seconds before ejecting it from the mold.

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I used the brush to sweep off any excess. But there you have it — like new and move-in ready. You can house the new product in the accompanying magnetic palette. The resulting shadow was structurally sound. The efficacy was not, well, effected, either. The shadow blended just the same and the color was not compromised.

Courtesy of Amy Sciarretto

My countertop was a bit messy after my Fixy Master Class. But it was nothing a blast of surface cleanser and a paper towel didn't quickly wipe away.

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The Fixy Kit also eliminates waste. It is so much more than a hack — it's a literal makeup lifesaver.