How Long Will The iPhone X Battery Last? Apple Keeps Upgrading Its Lifespan

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Apple CEO Tim Cook unveiled the company's latest iPhone models on Tuesday, Sept. 12, at an event held at its new Apple Park headquarters in California. With the release falling on a date just slightly over a decade since the first iPhone's release date — June 29, 2007 — many Apple enthusiasts had high expectations for the occasion. Cook unveiled three new models — the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and the iPhone X — during his presentation. The iPhone X is a higher-end, more expensive version of the other two models. Among other questions, you may be asking yourself how long will the iPhone X battery last.

According to Cook, the iPhone X's battery is built to last two hours longer than the existing iPhone. Compared to previous versions, this battery lifespan is notably longer.

The previous battery lifespans of iPhone models have been:

  • iPhone Original — 8 hours of talk time, 250 hours on standby
  • iPhone 3G — 5 hours of talk time, 300 hours on standby
  • iPhone 3GS — 5 hours of talk time, 300 hours on standby
  • iPhone 4 — 7 hours of talk time, 300 hours on standby
  • iPhone 4S — 8 hours of talk time, 200 hours on standby
  • iPhone 5 — 8 hours of talk time, 225 hours on standby
  • iPhone 5S — 10 hours of talk time, 250 hours on standby
  • iPhone 6 — 14 hours of talk time, 10 days on standby
  • iPhone 6S Plus — 24 hours of talk time, 16 days on standby
  • iPhone SE — 14 hours of talk time, 10 days on standby
  • iPhone 7 — 14 of talk time, 10 days on standby
  • iPhone 7 Plus — 21 hours of talk time, 16 days on standby
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More pressure is sure to be placed on this year's iPhone's sales. Since the first iPhone's release in 2007, sales have gone up for the gadget every year — that is, until 2016. For the first time, sales dropped for the famous cell phone last year by roughly 20 million units — from 231.22 million sold worldwide in 2015 to 211.88 sold around the world in 2016.

Will the company attempt to lower prices as a way to lure customers? CEO Tim Cook recently insisted in a Fortune interview that Apple's products were not solely made for the rich, stressing that the price of the product is based on its value. Cook added:

We don’t make commodity kind of products. And we don’t disparage people that do; it’s a fine business model. But it’s not the business that we’re in. But if you look across our product lines, you can buy an iPad today for under $300. You can buy an iPhone, depending upon which one you select, for in that same kind of ballpark. And so these are not for the rich. We obviously wouldn’t have over a billion products that are in our active installed base if we were making them for the rich because that’s a sizable number no matter who’s looking at the numbers.

How much more efficient the new iPhone X model will be — along with the price for its value — will be assessed in the days to come.