Statesman Whiskey Is Real So Drink Up, 'Kingsman' Fans

20th Century Fox
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For many Kingsman: The Secret Service fans, the chance to do, well, anything that the characters in the sleeper hit do in the films is an exciting prospect. And for fans of a good libation and the Kingsman series, getting the chance to sip the mysterious whiskey found in the final scene of the first film is likely an even better prospect. Luckily for those people, Statesman Whiskey from the Kingsman series is very real.

Of course, those who are familiar with Halle Berry's now-viral antics from San Diego Comic-Con's Kingsman: The Golden Circle panel probably already know that (though as Jezebel pointed out, it's highly doubtful the actress really downed half a pint of 95 proof liquor on stage). And while the film did release a trailer that doubled as an ad for the IRL product to coincide with the Kentucky Derby, at this year's Con, fans were also finally able to test the golden elixir and hear all about why Kingsman series writer, producer, and director, Matthew Vaughn, decided to include an actual liquor product in his anticipated sequel.

Apparently, history demanded it. As it turns out, there was only one whiskey brand that existed at the time of the film that still exists to this day: Old Forester. (Or be more specific, it's the only bourbon brand distilled before, during and after prohibition that's still owned by the same company.) Sure, it still seems a little like product placement, but I'm a sucker for history so it's pretty legitimate product placement.

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Statesman Whiskey will be on sale to coincide with the film, hitting most major liquor retailers, and according to the team at Old Forrester, they don't plan on stopping production on the whiskey when the buzz for the film dies down. The 95 proof liquor will reportedly remain a permanent fixture in their lineup for the foreseeable future.

So, it would seem that this part of movie history is firmly here to stay. Good thing it's pretty darn tasty too.  

Editor's Note: This article has been changed from its original version.