These Are All The Women Elected To Congress In 2018

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The success of women candidates was closely tracked throughout the midterm elections as a record-breaking number battled for a seat at the table. Now that the results are in, year highlight how much progress was made, as well as how far the nation still has to go before reaching true gender parity in Washington D.C.

In 2018, , making up 20 percent of the total 535 members. Representation in the Senate was slightly higher than the House; women comprised 23 percent of U.S. senators and just over 19 percent of all House members. Vermont became the only state that still , largely because popular male incumbents just keep running.

This year's midterm elections presented an opportunity to drastically increase the number of women serving on Capitol Hill, as election, by the Center for American Woman and Politics' count. (The majority of those candidates — 77 percent, to be exact — ran as Democrats.) A few women incumbents, including Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-Virginia) and Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-North Dakota), faced viable challengers attempting to unseat them, however.

Here are the women who were ultimately elected to Congress in 2018.

  1. (House, D-Florida)
  2. (House, D-Ohio)
  3. (House, D-Ohio)
  4. (House, D-Ohio)
  5. (Senate, D-Massachusetts)
  6. (House, D-Massachusetts)
  7. (House, D-Massachusetts)
  8. (House, D-Alabama)
  9. (House, D-Texas)
  10. (House, D-North Carolina)
  11. (House, D-Florida)
  12. (House, D-Virginia)
  13. (Senate, D-New York)
  14. (House, D-Delaware)
  15. (House, D-Illinois)
  16. (House, D-Illinois)
  17. (House, R-Indiana)
  18. (House, D-Texas)
  19. (House, D-Texas)
  20. (House, D-Texas)
  21. (House, D-Texas)
  22. (House, D-New York)
  23. (House, R-North Carolina)
  24. (House, D-Minnesota)
  25. (House, D-New York)
  26. (House, D-New York)
  27. (House, R-Indiana)
  28. (Senate, D-Minnesota)
  29. (House, D-New York)
  30. (House, D-New York)
  31. (House, D-Florida)
  32. (Senate, D-Wisconsin)
  33. (House, R-Alabama)
  34. (House, D-New Jersey)
  35. (House, R-Wyoming)
  36. (House, R-West Virginia)
  37. (House, D-Pennsylvania)
  38. (House, D-Pennsylvania)
  39. (Senate, R-Tennessee)
  40. (House, D-Kansas)
  41. (House, D-Connecticut)
  42. (House, D-Wisconsin)
  43. (House, D-Illinois)
  44. (House, D-Pennsylvania)
  45. (House, R-Nebraska)
  46. (House, D-Michigan)
  47. (House, D-Minnesota)
  48. (House, D-Michigan)
  49. (House, D-Massachusetts)
  50. (House, D-New Hampshire)
  51. (House, D-New Mexico)
  52. (House, R-Missouri)
  53. (House, D-Pennsylvania)
  54. (House, D-Colorado)
  55. (House, D-Florida)
  56. (House, D-Florida)
  57. (House, D-Florida)
  58. (House, D-Florida)
  59. (House, D-Michigan)
  60. (House, D-Virginia)
  61. (House, D-New Mexico)
  62. (House, D-New York)
  63. (House, D-Illinois)
  64. (House, D-Minnesota)
  65. (Senate, D-Hawaii)
  66. (House, D-Pennsylvania)
  67. (House, R-Mississippi)
  68. (House, D-Massachusetts)
  69. (House, R-New York)
  70. (Senate, D-Michigan)
  71. (House, D-New York)
  72. (House, D-Iowa)
  73. (House, D-Washington)
  74. (Senate, D-Washington)
  75. (House, D-Oregon)
  76. (House, D-Iowa)
  77. (House, D-Arizona)
  78. (House, R-Missouri)
  79. (House, D-Oklahoma)
  80. (House, R-Washington)
  81. (House, D-California)
  82. (House, D-Minnesota)
  83. (House, D-California)
  84. (House, D-California)
  85. (House, D-California)
  86. (House, D-Washington)
  87. (House, D-Virginia)
  88. (House, D-California)
  89. (House, D-Texas)
  90. (House, D-California)
  91. (House, D-Connecticut)
  92. (House, D-California)
  93. (House, D-California)
  94. (House, D-Hawaii)
  95. (House, D-California)
  96. (House, D-California)
  97. (House, D-Maine)
  98. (House, R-Arizona)
  99. (House, D-California)
  100. (House, D-California)
  101. (House, D-California)
  102. (House, D-California)
  103. (House, D-California)
  104. (House, D-California)
  105. (House, D-Michigan)
  106. (House, D-Nevada)
  107. (House, D-Nevada)
  108. (Senate, D-California)
  109. (Senate, D-Nevada)
  110. (House, D-Michigan)
  111. (House, D-California)
  112. (House, D-Georgia)
  113. (Senate, D-Arizona)

As of Wednesday morning, projections for how many seats varied, though it was certain that more than 100 women were elected to Congress on Tuesday night. Although there may , maybe the country got something a little better: a historic pink wave.

Lauren Holter contributed to this report.