These National Walkout Tweets & Photos Of People Protesting Kavanaugh Are A Must-See

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While Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was divisive from the beginning because of his conservative political leanings, the allegations of sexual misconduct against him (which he has denied) have turned his confirmation process into a very tense moment. On Monday, nationwide protests against his confirmation erupted. Tweets about the national walkout to protest Kavanaugh show you how heated this moment really is.

On the first day of Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings in the Senate, protestors showed up dressed up in costumes from the Handmaid's Tale in order to take a stand against what they saw as Kavanaugh's opposition to Roe v. Wade, as Huffington Post reported. His hearings, then, saw fiery exchanges about women's rights with female senators like Dianne Feinstein and Kamala Harris. After the hearings ended, a report came out revealing that Christine Blasey Ford claimed that Kavanaugh had attempted to rape her when the two of them were both teenagers. And on Sunday, the New Yorker published allegations from a second woman, Deborah Ramirez, who alleged that Kavanaugh had exposed himself to her at a party during their freshman year at Yale. Kavanaugh has denied both of these claims.

Now, the discussion of these allegations and Kavanaugh's potential confirmation has engulfed the news cycle — and it could do the same to the streets of America. Here are some tweets from the protests.

1. The Women's March Is There

womensmarch on Twitter

The Women's March is speaking out strongly for women.

2. A Private Walkout

ninjastephm on Twitter

People found ways to participate even if that didn't mean walking out of an actual school or office.

3. Not All Of The Protesting Was Loud

emmyrossum on Twitter

In fact, some of it was silent.

4. Women Aren't In This Alone

silasdhouse on Twitter

Many men joined the walkout.

5. Elected Officials Also Stood Up

senblumenthal on Twitter

Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut joined students at Yale.

6. People Prepared With Black Clothes And Signs

cmclymer on Twitter

The whole purpose of the walkout is a reminder to believe those who speak out about their stories of sexual assault and harassment.

7. Many Major Groups Were Involved

ppact on Twitter

Planned Parenthood has been a staunch defender of women's rights, and its employees didn't bow out this time.

8. A Place For Everyone

transequality on Twitter

Inclusivity is important in the push to believe survivors, because anyone can be a survivor.

9. A Matter Of Human Rights

hrc on Twitter

The right to live without the fear of sexual assault should be a basic one, right?

10. Dogs, Of Course, Allowed

alexacaitlyn77 on Twitter

At least one canine companion showed up for the cause.

11. A Turning Point?

amandalitman on Twitter

This could be a moment that protestors — and the rest of America — remembers. Maybe it will have a lasting effect on a young girl somewhere who, because of it, will grow up to have political ambitions, the executive director of Run For Something wrote.

This is a difficult moment for survivors of sexual assault, as they've had to watch lawmakers — including the president — treat women telling their stories of alleged sexual assault with skepticism. It's unclear whether conversations will start changing immediately — or even if it will halt Kavanaugh's confirmation. However, there's no doubt that the subject of sexual assault, and how to handle the repercussions it has on survivors, is on many people's minds.