Travis Scott & Kylie Jenner Won't Let Stormi Watch TV & That's Actually A Good Thing

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The Kardashian-Jenners are basically reality show royalty. They're the first family of pre-taped drama. They live their lives on-screen in front of tons of people, but Kylie Jenner and Travis Scott won't let Stormi watch TV, according to a recent interview Scott did with Rolling Stone.

Speaking to the publication about how he and Jenner plan on raising their first child, the rapper explained,

"Today kids are on iPads. There’s so much technology, they don’t play outside anymore. That’s what Astroworld Festival was about... That’s why, with Stormi — no TV. That TV sh*t is out."

Now, right off the bat, you're probably scratching your head and thinking, "Huh, that's interesting." Jenner first became famous thanks to TV. Earlier this year, Forbes reported that some seasons of Keeping Up With the Kardashians have attracted an average of around 2 million viewers. Life of Kylie averaged a million on its own. When Kim Kardashian married Kris Humphries in an on-screen special back in 2011, reportedly more than 10 million people tuned in.

And yet, despite the fact that TV is such a huge part of Jenner and Scott's life — and income — the new parents are saying that Stormi won't be allowed to watch. It's certainly a little surprising to hear Scott say, but then again, it's not exactly a bad thing.

First of all, Stormi isn't even a year old. What does she need to watch TV for anyway? It's not like her little baby brain can even begin to process things like current events or the latest episode of The Good Place. In fact, it actually takes about 18 months before infants start to understand that things on a screen also exist in the real world, HealthyChildren.org revealed.

Besides, at 10 months, most babies begin to thrive off of experiences and gain a lot from being outside, author and Parents advisor Michele Borba, Ed.D. told the publication. "Fresh air, sand, mud, dirt, grasses, puppies, other kids ... each is an opportunity to expand baby's awareness of the wonderful, wide, wide, world," Borba explained to Parents. "All of these different stimuli help cognitive and language development as well."

Not only that, but in 2016, The Urban Child Institute reported that "infant exposure to television has been linked to delayed language development and kindergarten readiness skills." The institute also noted that "early exposure to TV has also been connected to attention disorders and sleep problems," and "has been linked to behavior problems and to long-term effects on social development, classroom engagement, and academic achievement," once a child reaches the age of 3.

So yeah, Scott and Jenner's decision to keep Stormi away from TV likely isn't just based on their own personal preferences. She'll learn way more from being outdoors (and on tour probably). She can't even really understand TV at the moment anyway, and exposing her to screens can actually hinder her growth. Seems like Scott and Jenner are definitely on the right track with this whole parenting thing. Great job, you two.