What Is The Daily Stormer? The Neo-Nazi Website Published A Disgusting Article About Heather Heyer

Win McNamee/Getty Images News/Getty Images

The domain name provider and web hosting company GoDaddy booted the white supremacist website The Daily Stormer off its platform on Sunday. The decision came after The Daily Stormer published an article mocking Heather Heyer, the woman who was killed on Saturday after a white nationalist ran over a crowd counter-protesters during a pro-nazi, pro-Confederate rally in Charlottesville. The article in question derided Heyer for her weight and for not having had children by the age of 32.

Multiple Twitter users sent screencaps of the story to GoDaddy on Sunday. The company's official account eventually responded to several users informing them that The Daily Stormer had been notified that it needed to find a new host.

"We informed The Daily Stormer that they have 24 hours to move the domain to another provider, as they have violated our terms of service," GoDaddy wrote.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, The Daily Stormer is the most popular hate site in America. Comments from its users have garnered public attention after President Trump's failure to specifically denounce white nationalist and white supremacist groups in his statement following the chaos in Charlottesville.

"We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides," President Trump said in a televised statement from his golf course in Bedminster, New Jersey on Saturday. "On many sides. It's been going on for a long time in our country. Not Donald Trump, not Barack Obama. This has been going on for a long, long time."

Commenters on The Daily Stormer evidently approved of Trump's insinuation that the violence could also be attributed to counter-protesters opposing the white supremacist rally-goers.

One Daily Stormer member wrote:

In an email to NBC News, GoDaddy spokesman Dan Race said that The Daily Stormer could not previously be taken down because the website's content was protected by the First Amendment and the right to free speech. However, the company appears to consider the post-Charlottesville content to be in violation of its terms of service.

“Given their latest article comes on the immediate heels of a violent act, we believe this type of article could incite additional violence, which violates our terms of service,” said Race.

A 20-year-old man by the name of James Alex Fields Jr. is currently the accused suspect in Heather Heyer's murder.