How The White House Reward For ISIS Leader Information Compares To Other Rewards Its Offered

On Wednesday, the Obama administration announced a $5 million reward for the leader of ISIS's immigration and logistics committee. Tirad al-Jarba, better known as Abu-Muhammad al-Shimali, reportedly oversees ISIS's efforts to bring foreign fighters into Syria, along with managing financial transfers and smuggling activities. The bounty is part of the State Department's Rewards for Justice program — and $5 million is actually one of the most common amounts offered.

The State Department will offer up to $5 million for any information that leads to "the location or identification" of al-Jarba, according to a statement released Wednesday. The statement designates al-Jarba as a "key leader" within ISIS and claims that al-Jarba has worked with ISIS since 2005, while it was still a faction of Al Qaeda. Al-Jarba himself has been on the Obama administration's radar since at least September, when the Treasury placed him on Specially Designated Nationals list, thereby freezing his financial assets and prohibiting any American person or company from working with him.

In his current position within ISIS, al-Jarba reportedly facilitates the movement of foreign recruits to ISIS strongholds in Syria. These foreign fighters usually come from Australia, Europe, other parts of the Middle East, and beyond, and they usually pass through Gaziantep, Turkey, in order to get to Syria. According to the State Department, al-Jarba has also managed ISIS's processing center for new recruits in Azaz, Syria.

Al-Jarba is just one nearly 75 individuals on the State Department's "Wanted for Justice" list. The list includes terrorists from around the world, such as Al Qaeda leaders, participants in violent attacks, and operatives associated with other extremist networks. Each individual on the list has a bounty similar to that of al-Jarba, although some people are worth much more to the Rewards for Justice program than others.

The sums offered by Rewards for Justice range from $1 million to $25 million; more than 50 people on the list, including al-Jarba, have rewards of up to $5 million associated with them. Currently, the highest award that the program is offering — up to $25 million — is for information that brings Ayman al-Zawahiri to justice. Al-Zawahiri is identified by the State Department as a "physician and founder of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad" organization. It is thought that al-Zawahiri served as an adviser and doctor to Osama bin Laden.

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Rewards for Justice was established in 1984 to bring terrorists to justice and prevent future terrorist activity. Over the course of its history, Rewards for Justice has paid more than $125 million to more than 80 individuals for information about individuals on and missing from its list. The largest reward to date was $30 million, paid to an individual who provided information about Uday and Qusay Hussein, sons of former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein.

To provide information on al-Jarba or another member of the Rewards for Justice list, individuals can contact the organization by phone at (800)-877-3927, by email at info@rewardsforjustice.net, or by snail mail at Rewards for Justice, Washington, D.C., 20520-0303. Rewards for Justice also accepts tips online. All information is kept confidential and tips can be submitted anonymously.