What Type Of Color Corrector Should You Be Using? Here's Every Type, Explained

If you enjoy keeping up with makeup trends, chances are you're already all over the color correcting fad this year. But with so many different products on the market, what type of color corrector should you use? Sure, you've probably narrowed down which colors you want to play with whether it's green to correct redness, lavender to correct sallowness, or peach to correct blue tones. What with the primers, powders, concealers, and every other form of color correcting though, it's good to know which type will most efficiently and effectively target the areas you want to correct.

Because color correcting now isn't like it was back when your options were basically just a green stick concealer or a peach liquid concealer, it's helpful to know how a pink primer differs from a pink concealer, and how those differ from a pink powder. Of course, you can always use a variety of types to target different concerns, and even layer them to achieve a totally neutral base. In order to do that to the best of your ability and get the most out of your color correctors, here's what all of those different formulas are best for, plus when you should use them within your makeup routine for a perfectly corrected complexion.

Drops

Algenist Reveal Concentrated Color Correcting Drops, $38, Sephora

If you have a larger surface area to cover and want slightly more pigmentation than a typical primer, try color correcting drops. These can be used alone or before makeup and blended out all over the face, or even mixed in with a moisturizer for subtler correction.

Primers

Stila One Step Correct, $36, Stila Cosmetics

Again, if you want to target larger zones on your face, color-correcting primers can help neutralize with a lighter veil of color. Plus, it will help whatever makeup you apply on top last better and longer throughout the day.

Pot Correctors

Becca Backlight Targeted Colour Corrector, $32, Becca Cosmetics

Pot concealers and correctors are generally thicker and creamier in consistency and have higher pigmentation. This type of color corrector tends to be better for more serious trouble areas and people with normal to dry skin. Those with oily skin might find that these thicker correctors exaggerate pores and break down on the skin more easily. Blend this out over areas of concern before applying foundation and concealer.

Stick Correctors

Smashbox Color Correcting Stick, $23, Smashbox

Stick correctors tend to also be creamy and pigmented, though often aren't as thick as pot correctors. Plus, the smaller tip allows you to easily target smaller or more detailed areas like individual pimples or the contour around the nose. Again, this type of corrector is best layered under foundation and concealer.

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Liquid Correctors

Yves Saint Laurent Touche Eclat Neutralizer, $38, YSL Beauty

Because liquid correctors typically have thinner consistencies and aren't as high-coverage as pot or stick correctors, these can be used under foundation or even sandwiched between foundation and concealer or foundation and a pigmented setting powder.

Loose Powder

NYX Color Correcting Powder, $10 each, NYX Cosmetics

Of the powder correctors, loose powders tend to have the most pigment (although they still won't usually be as pigmented as cream or liquid correctors). These can be worn alone or over foundation and concealer, and are great for setting and mattifying oilier complexions.

Pressed Powder

MAC Prep + Prime CC Colour Correcting Compact, $22, MAC Cosmetics

Slightly more translucent than a loose powder (and much easier to travel with), a pressed color-correcting powder can be used to neutralize the skin with a soft veil of correction. Plus, it's perfect for setting foundation and concealer and mattifying the skin.

Finishing Powder

e.l.f. Mineral Pearls, $8, Target

Finally, finishing powders with color-correcting properties give a light wash of neutralizing radiance. These powders usually include multiple colors to gently target any and every concern while lightly illuminating the skin.

Images: algenist.com; Courtesy of Brands