Blogger Dan Mahle Quit Porn For a Year and This Is What He Learned

Porn. For some people, it’s an annoying Internet roadblock that reveals itself in pop up and Tumblr GIF form from time to time. For others, it’s a way of life. After realizing his X-rated habit of ten years was, in fact, an addiction, blogger Dan Mahle quit porn for a whole year. The result? It not only changed his perception of women, but of himself.

Mahle blogged about his experience for Change From Within. He begins by clarifying that just because something is culturally acceptable, doesn’t mean it’s a good idea (like Jagerbombs). Mahle also explains how he hid his “habit”, and that in previous attempts to quit he would find a reason to go back to it. Yikes, sounds just like an addict to me.

I didn’t realize how much watching porn manipulated my mind, warping my sexuality, numbing my feelings, and impacting my relationships with women. And I was not alone.

He even outlines why porn is just as addictive as heroin, and includes a nifty video to complete his argument with the help of stick figures (it sounds silly, but it’s actually very informative).

Mahle says that avid porn watching can not only breed intimacy issues, it could also could be responsible for men's violent behavior toward women (depending on what kind of porn you watch, of course).

The reality was that most of the videos I found online had titles that included words like “bitch” or “slut” and showcased controlling behaviors that were rooted in a culture of subjugation and objectification, where women are nothing more than sexual bodies to be exploited and dominated by men.

Like most recovering addicts, Mahle’s life changed drastically after quitting. (Maybe “changed drastically” aren’t the right words, more like “he became one of those guys you’d want your parents to meet.”) Mahle describes how he’s now more connected to his emotions post-porn, and how his creativity and passion are at an all-time high due to raised self confidence. He also noticed a huge change in his perception of women.

I’ve also noticed that I am often able to stay more present with women now, rather than projecting fantasies onto them. This was hard to do when my mind was cluttered with images from porn videos. This newfound presence has also allowed me to begin to dismantle some of the subconscious sexism that I’ve held, helping me work toward becoming a better ally to the women in my life.

Though the messages that porn sends depends largely on the type of porn that you watch, this is definitely food for thought. Maybe Mahle and his stick figures are on to something.

Image: Graja/Fotolia