What Time Do The Indiana Primaries Start? It'll Be An Early Morning For The Hoosier State

It's time to move on to the next state to hold Democratic and Republican primaries: Indiana. These primaries fall on May 3, which leads America into its last leg of primary elections. Up for grabs are 83 delegates on the Democratic side and 57 for the Republicans. What time can residents expect to kick off their day of voting? The Indiana primaries begin when polls open at 6:00 a.m. It's an early one for Hoosier voters.

Indiana is the only state voting on May 3. Apparently, the state's unusual nickname has something to do with the old informal greeting "who's there," which, when a resident is clamping a pipe or a sewing needle in his or her mouth, could sound a lot like hoosier. The nickname speaks to Indiana's traditional Midwestern values and general "homebody-ness." The open primary system also speaks to that inherent openness of Indiana's people, whether that's intentional or not.

Some important information for voters is that, unfortunately, the registration deadline has already passed (it was April 4), as has the last day to request a ballot by mail (that was April 25). By noon on May 2, voters may submit absentee ballots in person at the office of the circuit court clerk or a satellite office. The same goes for confined voters or those who are caring for a confined person requesting delivery of a ballot by an absentee voter board. This is all listed in detail on Indiana's elections page.

Additionally, a public law (109-2005) requires all voters to present a government-issued photo ID before voting. In order to qualify, the identification must include one's legal name, a photograph, an expiration date in the future or which has only passed after the last general election, and come from the state of Indiana or the federal government.

As of now, Indiana's electoral results could manifest in a few different forms. Each presidential candidate seems fairly confident of his or her ability to command the Hoosier State's attention — well, except John Kasich, who has opted out of Indiana as per his negotiations with Ted Cruz. The results are dependent on who shows up to the polls come next Tuesday. The race is tightening up, but surprises may still arise where Americans least expect them.