When Is The Last Primary? One Date Is Particularly Significant For Both Parties

Tuesdays and Saturdays are going to become much less riveting in the next month as primary elections come to a close and the general election campaign season begins. It's time to say goodbye to primary-packed super Tuesdays and all of the nicknames that accompany the states and their election days. The last presidential primary is scheduled for June 14 and is reserved for Washington D.C. Democrats. It's only natural that the party of the current president in the nation's capitol should cast the final ballot.

Considering anything could happen in a month's time, the nation still has a ways to go before returning to a state of political normality. The candidates who have made it this far — Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Bernie Sanders — must endure about a dozen more primary elections before a nominee is officially announced. Five of those 12 are reserved for the Democrats only and one will feature Republicans only.

For both parties, June 7 holds the greatest significance. On that day, California, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota will vote. The Democrats will also participate in a caucus in North Dakota. About a month later, they will hold their National Convention on July 25 and the Republicans will have theirs exactly a week prior. Each lasts about four days.

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Before the convention arrives, the Republican Party, in particular, has to mend its divides. During an interview with CNN's Jake Tapper, Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan said he's simply not ready to support Trump until the candidate himself makes an effort to unite the entire conservative party. Shortly after the statement was made, Trump responded using intentionally similar language.

I am not ready to support Speaker Ryan's agenda. Perhaps in the future we can work together and come to an agreement about what is best for the American people.

The House Speaker formally invited Trump to a pre-convention meeting set for Thursday so that they may sort out their differences.

Having both said we need to unify the party, Speaker Ryan has invited Donald Trump to meet with members of the House Republican leadership in Washington on Thursday morning to begin a discussion about the kind of Republican principles and ideas that can win the support of the American people this November.

At one point in the election, Trump rivals were betting on a contested convention. Now, that possibility is largely off of the table and the real estate mogul is beginning to plan his general election campaign. The Democrats will likely have a smoother, less controversial convention, regardless of whether Clinton or Sanders wins.