Mark Cuban's Campaign Slogan Would Put Donald Trump's To Shame

The rise of Donald Trump as a presidential candidate has led to speculation that Mark Cuban, a fellow businessman and reality TV personality, could also run for president. Cuban denies that he’s planning on jumping into the race, but he did entertain the notion in an interview on Fox News Channel’s Watters World. Among other insights, Cuban revealed what presidential campaign slogan he’d use if he did run, and it would truly put Trump’s to shame.

“Let’s get paid,” Cuban said when asked what tagline he’d use in a presidential bid. And that really gets down to business, doesn’t it? Sure, Trump might “make America great again,” but what good is that if you’re broke? Promising to literally make Americans rich, on the other hand, is a pretty compelling pitch for a presidential candidate.

Alas, Cuban isn’t running for president. However, he did offer some surprisingly insightful observations on Trump’s presidential campaign, and more specifically, his qualifications (or lack thereof) to serve as commander in chief.

“I think there’s two Donald Trumps,” Cuban said in the interview, which will air Saturday night. “There’s the Donald Trump that plays to an audience, there’s a Donald Trump that does what he thinks it takes to win and then there’s the Donald Trump that you sit and talk to.”

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This isn’t the only time the “two Trumps” theory has surfaced. After ending his own presidential campaign for president and endorsing the Donald, Ben Carson also asserted that “there are two different Donald Trumps.” The idea is that the bombastic, racist demagogue you seen on TV is just an act, and Trump is actually swell guy if you just sit down and get to know him.

Cuban echoed this sentiment, but unlike Carson, he didn’t mean it as a compliment. Rather, Cuban cited the dual Trumps as a reason to be skeptical of his temperament.

“The Donald Trump that I’ve met when I sit and talk to him, yeah, there’s a chance he has the temperament,” Cuban concluded. “The problem is, we don’t know which Donald we’re gonna get.”

This gets to the heart of one of the biggest concerns about a potential Trump presidency: Nobody really knows what he would do as president. Because Trump lacks ideological consistency, allegiance to the Republican Party, and anything resembling a voting record, it’s impossible to predict how he’d behave if he became president. And that, in and of itself, is a disqualifying trait for a presidential candidate.