Will Walter White Be On ‘Better Call Saul’? If Bryan Cranston Has His Way, There's Hope — VIDEO

Good news, Breaking Bad fans, Walter White might live to see another day. After five seasons of making, selling, and hustling drugs on the mean streets of Albuquerque, Walter White might have a little life left in him. That is, if the actor who played him, Bryan Cranston, has his way: On The Rich Eisen Show, Cranston said he wanted to see Walter White on Better Call Saul, and would return to the character if the show creators asked him to.

You know Better Call Saul: It’s the prequel series that features many of the same characters as Breaking Bad, of course. Set six years before Walter White ever walked the streets of Albuquerque as a drug dealer, the show follows Breaking Bad’s Saul Goodman (original name Jimmy McGill) long before the original series takes place. But with the timeline all kinds of screwed up for these two to meet, how exactly could an appearance by Walter White happen on Better Call Saul?

It might not be as difficult as you would think. After all, Walter is living in Albuquerque around the same time that Jimmy McGill was trying to make a name for himself as a lawyer. I bet even a brief cameo (where the two cross paths in some unknowing way, maybe?) would be enough to make every single fan in America happy. But it could also be a bigger crossover role than that. If Better Call Saul lasts six seasons — or if they decide to skip ahead a couple years in between Breaking Bad seasons — the show could easily bump right up against when Saul Goodman and Walter White meet for the very first time.

The Rich Eisen Show on YouTube

In fact, I think that would make one killer conclusion to the series. No pun intended.

So I think the show writers need to milk this possibility for all its worth. After all, Cranston said in the same interview that he owes show creator Vince Gilligan “so much” for choosing him for his career-defining role as Walter White. “If they were to call me,” Cranston admitted, “I would say, ‘Yes, you don’t have to finish the pitch, I’m there, and what do you want me to do?’”

I can’t think of a more definitive answer than that. Vince Gilligan, the ball is in your court.