The 15 Craziest Candies From Around the World To Give Your Easter Basket Some Oomph

WASHINGTON - MARCH 28: Colorerd eggs sit in a basket for children to use during the Easter Egg roll March 28, 2005 on the White House's South Lawn in Washington, DC. Kids of all ages have hunted and raced edible eggs here since 1878. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Travel the world and you'll find that candy comes in all shapes and flavors. While you're filling your Easter baskets with Peeps and Skittles, we've gone beyond borders to find some unusual snacks you may not want from the Easter bunny — some that will make you cringe and some that will make you want to binge. Forget chocolate and licorice — we're bringing the flavors of wasabi, tomato, and even tuna fish (uh...yum?) to your Easter basket.

Wasabi Kit Kats

America plays it pretty safe when it comes to the classic chocolate treat — other countries get strawberry, cookie dough, and cookies & cream, and Japan offers wasabi, potato, toasted soy, and red bean soup-flavored KitKats.

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Salsagheti

This Mexican confection is made of sugar-coated watermelon strings topped with tamarind sauce. The result: A sweet, savory, and spicy flavor compared to “swallowing the tequila worm.”

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Barratt Shrimps and Bananas

England’s strangest confections are these pink and yellow gummies (or what they call “foams” across the pond) with a name sure enough to scare you away, even though the pink “shrimp” chews are actually strawberry flavored.

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Musk Sticks

These have the texture of Altoids and the flavor of roses and orange blossoms, which some people have compared to eating incense.

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Kopiko Mini Coffee

Skip your morning cup of Joe and go for a mini coffee hard candy — made with real coffee and espresso beans — instead. The Thailand caffeine jolt comes in sweetened coffee, latte, and cappuccino flavors. 

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Okonomiyaki Drops

We’ve got to hand it to Japan for coming up with a way to turn savory foods into bite-sized candies. Each of these drops packs the full flavor of dishes like sushi or Japanese pizza (think mayo, radish, cabbage and onion). 

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Wagashi

Another one straight from Japan, this mildly sweet jelly confection is made from yams and bean paste.

Image: Fae’s Twist and Tango

Dragon Beard Candy

Popular in Turkey, Iran, and China, this treat tastes just like cotton candy and is often wrapped around coconut, peanuts, or sesame seeds. 

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Creamy Corn Candy

Read that again: This is NOT Candy Corn. Instead, you can get the full flavor of creamed corn — yes, the type you serve at Thanksgiving — in candy form. Find these sweets in Malaysia.

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Balsito Bars

This isn’t the wackiest bar out there but we definitely want to give it a try. Whole milk biscuits are topped with things like raisins, hazelnuts, almonds, honey, and Christmas cookies, then coated in Italian milk chocolate.

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Turkish Pepper Candies

First they’re sour, then they’re…hot! We’ll skip these Danish hard candies, loaded with spicy pepper and sour black licorice flavor.

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Salty Tomato Candies

We don’t mean to hate on Japan, but they sure have a knack for wacky sweets. Like these salty tomato hard candies.

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Violet Crumble

These chocolate-coated honeycomb bars from Australia basically fall apart the second you open them.

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Jane-Jane Tasty Tuna Tidbits

These tiny candies from Taiwan were developed to boost your brain power. For an American version, try sardine-flavored Jelly Beans.

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Durian Candy Bars

We’d like to meet the candy maker who thought a bar filled with a fruit so smelly it’s been banned from public transportation was a good idea. You can find these in Southeast Asia.

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