'RHOBH' Fans Want Brandi Glanville Fired but Come On, the Show Needs Her

In staying true to this month's theme of acknowledging the roles women have played throughout history, there is one reality TV star whose presence has fans wanting to make her a thing of the past: Brandi Glanville. Apparently The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star's outspoken nature has viewers so upset, they filed a petition to have Glanville removed from the cast. The complaint states Glanville's "jokes about racial stereotypes and child molestation" go "beyond the point of entertainment," and calls for her removal from the hit Bravo TV show.

On part one of RHOBH's reunion show, Glanville explained that she would "love to be controlled and perfect and not so blahh all the time, but that's not who I am." This statement pretty much sums up her loose-lipped persona. During one segment of last night's reunion, she basically insinuated that her cast member Lisa Vanderpump drinks more than she's willing to admit, lives in the valley and filed for bankruptcy. And Glanville later accused cast member Joyce Giraud of dating short, rich men and dressing like an ice skater. Back in December, Glanville came under fire when she assured Giraud that the reason she couldn't swim was because she was black.

Addressing the petition, Glanville tweeted:

Glanville obviously has absolutely no filter. But I don't think her actions are petition-worthy. For one, reality TV celebs aren't exactly diplomatic and are guaranteed to say some stuff that will piss you off. Plus the petition truly could apply to any reality show star. And finally, there would be no consistency in firing her if cast members like Teresa and Joe Guidice, who are both preparing for federal prison stints, are allowed to remain on the show.

Glanville isn't the first reality TV star to prompt a change.org petition, but let's face it: Reality TV is not where you go when seeking higher moral ground. If they fire her, they better be prepared to fire a whole heap of reality TV celebrities or scrap the idea of reality TV altogether, and the likelihood of that happening is further from reality than reality TV itself.