Hillary Clinton Reportedly Won't Concede Tonight Because "Every Vote Should Count"

Hillary Clinton addresses the crowd inside the Reynolds Coliseum on the campus of North Carolina State University for the final campaign stop before election day, in Raleigh, North Carolina, on November 7, 2016. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump battled for votes on a frenzied final day of campaigning, telling Americans the country's fate rides on who they choose as the next US president. / AFP / Logan Cyrus (Photo credit should read LOGAN CYRUS/AFP/Getty Images)
Source: AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Election Day 2016 will undoubtedly go down in history as one of the nation's most unforgettable and though the night is winding down, it isn't over yet. Campaign Chairman John Podesta said that Hillary Clinton won't concede tonight, according to RealClearPolitics reporter Caitlin Huey-Burns. "They're still counting votes and every vote should count," he said, according to the reporter's tweet. "Everybody should head home...We will have more to say tomorrow." Update: According to the Associated Press, Donald Trump has won the presidential election. NBC News correspondent Kelly O'Donnell also reported that Clinton has conceded to Trump over the phone, according to an unnamed source.

Earlier: Projections for the presidential race have been jumping back and forth between candidates all night, and though Donald Trump has been holding a steady lead for a few hours, it's still being deemed "too close to call" by multiple media outlets. And even if Trump does reach 270 electoral votes (according to The New York Times, he holds 265 at the time of publication), it makes sense that the Clinton campaign would want to hold off on conceding to Trump until all votes have been counted.

Multiple states with a significant amount of electoral votes — including Michigan, Wisconsin, and Arizona — haven't been called yet, and they could determine the winner of this election. Additionally, many states' votes were extremely close, most notably in Florida. According to CBS News, each state has different laws about at what margin a candidate could call for a recount, but with some, such as New Hampshire, allowing recounts for margins as large as 20 percent, it is possible that recounts could be called before a president-elect is officially named.

Currently, the Clinton campaign has not stated anything about calling for a recount, but as Podesta said, votes are still being counted. 

[Twitter Embed: https://twitter.com/CHueyBurnsRCP/status/796246807789637632]

Get some rest, because this tumultuous election isn't over yet.

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