Only Children Are Selfish? Psh, More Like Special: 29 Things Only We Understand

LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 02: (EDITORIAL USE ONLY) This photo dated Wednesday July 2, 2014, was taken to mark the first birthday of Prince George and shows the Prince during a visit to the Sensational Butterflies exhibition at the Natural History Museum on July 02, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by John Stillwell - WPA Pool /Getty Images)
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As a kid, I was never the type of only child who begged my parents for a brother or sister. Sure, there were a few times, probably after watching too many Mary-Kate & Ashley movies in a row, when I wished I had siblings, but mostly, I didn't mind my situation. After all, being an only child meant I never had to share, got lots of attention, and was definitely my parents' favorite. 

Still, there were downsides. As I got older, friends who had constantly fought with their siblings began to bond with them, and siblings who had already been close became practically inseparable. All the proof I had that having siblings wasn't all that great — the fighting, the jealousy, the clothes-stealing and parent-hogging — started to fade. Having siblings looked fun and enviable, and at times, I resented being an only child.

But while I still sometimes wish I had siblings, I don't really mind not having any. Yeah, it'd be nice to have a built-in best friend or a person to commiserate with at holiday dinners, but overall, being an only child has its perks — and all the other "only" kids, you know what I'm talking about. 

Here are 29 things that only an only child can truly understand.

you don't like to admit it, but Sharing is a Foreign Concept to you

You mean, you want that book I'm halfway through reading? Oh, and that dress, too? The one I just bought? 

Especially when it comes to food. We do not share food.

Not knowing how to share isn't selfish . . . it's prudent.

Getting Along With Your Parents is a Necessity

When you're an only child, you spend an inordinate amount of your time with your parents, with no one else there to share the attention. Family vacations, holiday dinners, weekend trips — that's a whole lot of time spent with just the three of you, and if you didn't get along, it'd be pretty rough. 

And you probably even Like Hanging Out With Them

Thankfully, you and your parents are as tight as can be, and all that time together is actually . . . fun. And even if you're not that close, they've always treated you more as a peer than most people's parents do. 

though there is often a lot of pressure placed on you

It's no wonder only children tend to be over-achievers — all that attention also means you get all the pressure to succeed and make your parents proud. 

still, The Idea of Having Siblings is Just Weird to you

Try to imagine yourself with a brother or sister, or God forbid, both. You can't, right? It's too weird to even imagine.

Like, Someone Else Knows Your Parents as Well As You Do? 

It just doesn't make sense.

you know People Judge You When You Say You're an Only Child

but you also know Only children aren't actually spoiled, selfish, and narcissistic. We're mature.

You're Used to Hearing "But You Don't Seem Like an Only Child!"

It may seem well-meaning, but is basically a way of saying, "Gee, you're way more normal than most of your kind!" We'll skip the backhanded compliments, please.

Except for a Few Times When They Go, "Oh . . . I Figured"

. . . And then you get intensely paranoid that you actually are spoiled, selfish, and narcissistic

still, You're Constantly Defending Only Children — Just look at Rory!

Despite what the stereotype leads people to believe, we're not all terrible. Only children can be normal, awesome people. 

And Chelsea!

And Harry!

. . . though some Only Children are actually the worst

'National Sibling Day' makes you sad

Does there really need to be a day to show off having siblings? Isn't that pretty much every day?

but you have a sense of humor about it

You started to post sad, lonely selfies and make fun of the whole damn thing with captions like "Love my siblings!!" or "Happy National Siblings Day to me!" like I did in this awkward, parent-taken photo. Speaking of which . . .

There are a Lot of Photos of You

Piano recitals, pre-school graduations, vacations in which you're constantly being told to stand in front of scenic places and not look so awkward: It's all documented, up there on your parents' mantel for the entire world to see.

Like, a Lot

The photos are everywhere. Upside: All that posing has given you plenty of time to perfect your look.

You Care A Lot About Your Friendships

As an only child, you take your friendships very seriously.

and your cousins

Because they Are The Closest Thing You Have to Sisters

Whether it's joining a sorority or just spilling your heart out to your closest friends, only children take all the "sisterhood" (or brotherhood) they can get.

still, You do Crave Your Alone Time

Growing up without siblings, you had to get used to doing things on your own. You're probably a reader or a writer, and even if you're not, you definitely don't need to be around people 24/7.

and You Don't Get Bored easily

You're perfectly capable of spending time with yourself, and in fact, you kind of love it. Boredom's not really an option, because years of entertaining yourself means that you can always find something to do.

Secretly, You Still Kind of Hope Your Parents Will Have Another Kid

Even those of us who are completely comfortable being only children still hold out a teensy bit of hope that our parents will have another kid. So what if you'd be 20 years older than your sibling, and your parents are nearing retirement? It's still possible. Right?

yup, the parent trap did a number on you

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but Meeting Other Only Children is the Best

It's like a special club, where all the members share an urge to tell everyone how not spoiled they are. Be proud to be a member.

because, just like our parents told us, we are special

Yup, pretty much. 

Images: Tumblr; Giphy

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