Fake Shorter Bangs Between Cuts With This Sneaky Little Styling Trick

LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 08: Actress Zooey Deschanel attends the 'New Girl' Season 3 Finale Screening and cast Q&A at Zanuck Theater at 20th Century Fox Lot on May 8, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images)
Source: Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

Oh, bangs. They really are a hair blessing and curse, since they require a lot of commitment, know-how, and maintenance. But when well-considered and done right, they're aces. When freshly cut, I lurve my fringe. My bangs be bangin'. Like Zooey Deschanel and her bangs, fringe is transformative for me. I usually wear them straight across, cut at eyebrow length and I'm militaristic about getting my hair cut every eight weeks. However, in between cut and color sessions, my bangs grow like weeds. They're unruly and while I like the Jane Birkin, lash-grazing look that I get about four or five weeks prior to a full cut, it does get annoying to constantly blow my bangs out my eyes, like I am doing right now as I type this. 

So, I get my bangs trimmed in between cuts, usually at three or four weeks in. But in order to fake the shorter look before the trim or the full cut, I have devised a cheap and easy trick to make my bangs appear shorter whenever I want them to. It does require some dexterity and finesse with a brush and a blow dryer. It took a few stabs to get it right but once I figured it out, I was able to get a shorter look before the snip.

The secret weapons? A dash of Living Proof Full Thickening Cream raked through the bangs while wet and a small barrel round brush by Conair.

Seriously, a dime-sized drop is all I use for styling while blow drying.

Then, while blow drying, I wrap the bangs around the barrel and pull brush down fast, so there is a little bend without any mushroom action going on. I don't want curl. I don't want volume. I don't want pouf. I don't want body.

I want a slight bend that offers a little lift and I get it by putting the brush under the bangs, close to the hairline but not too close, or I end up with doll hair, and pulling down. If you get too much bend, it's an easy fix with more brushing.

Blow the bangs dry first, using the brush to lift and bend, all the while directing airflow downward. I use the brush for the fringe, too, and then I flip over and blow dry the length while upside down for some fullness. When I am standing upright again, I use the round brush on the bangs once more, repeating the wrap and pull action.

I finish with dollop of Living Proof's AMP texturizing cream, which I rub into my layered angles and bangs, spritz a little dry shampoo because I like the smell, and I am good to faux!

Images: Amy Sciarretto

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