Who Are the Hottest People On Hinge? They May Work for This Tech Company

Every nursed a crush on an employee at the Apple store? Got a thing for the fresh-faced, hoodie-wrapped boyishness of Mark Zuckerberg? Prefer the more, uh, mature appearance of Bill Gates or Jeff Bezos? Well, the phone-based dating app "Hinge," which is kind of like a higher-class Tinder (thank goodness), has some data on workplace and attractiveness that's quite interesting. As reported in the Wall Street Journal, Amazon employees receive 14.2 percent more right swipes (acceptances) than the average Hinge user, but Apple employees receive .2 percent fewer right swipes. Microsoft, Google, and Facebook each rank somewhere in between.

A few caveats, though: Hinge, the app used to gather this data, is geared towards "young professionals." This could explain some of the counter-intuitiveness of the results. Apple Genius Bar employees, in my experience, tend to be hot, but they might self-identify more as retail or service employees than "professionals" per se.

Also these results are being reported as conveying "attractiveness," but maybe Hinge app users are responding to something else about the different employees' profiles. For all we know, maybe the Apple employees have gimmicky, overdone bio lines, and the Amazon employees have nice, normal bio lines. Alternatively, it could be something about the employees' social networks — Hinge prides itself on setting you up with "no randos," so potential matches are at least friends of one of your Facebook friends, and they can see where you work. Maybe Amazon employees have larger social networks than Apple employees.

But until more careful research is done, I guess that Amazon employees can bask in their attractiveness glory. Strangely, despite being more desirable than the average Hinge user, Amazon employees are themselves less picky than the average Hinge user about who they choose on the app. So, to Amazon daters out there, I say: it's time to step up your game!

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