Joan Didion's Face Is Illustrated on the Back of This Leather Jacket That You Are Really Going To Want

In highly professional terms, Joan Didion is a celebrated author and journalist, who boasts countless well-deserved awards and recognition and is even a working model for couture fashion brands. But a true fanatic would describe her as a true G.O.A.T. (Greatest of All Time); the real MVP, the purveyor of nonchalantness; the only model who can make 80 years old look downright sexy. And because she is also devilishly stylish, with her defining bob and larger-than-life specs, it only makes sense that there is a leather jacket bearing an illustration of Joan Didion's face.

The motorcycle jacket is, of course, riding on the coattail of the current buzz surrounding Didion and her new gig with Céline, in which she unintentionally and nonchalantly stole the 2014 title of "Breaking the Internet" without having to take off her clothes. The jacket is sleek and to the point, much like Didion herself, and is one of many illustrated products featured in the Alice Lancaster x VEDA collaboration. In addition, Lancaster, a New York-based painter and illustrator, has also hand painted the faces of other famed artists, such as David Bowie, Anna Piaggi and Frida Kahlo, on the backs of the jackets.

Of course, something this great doesn't come without a catch, and this is quite a pricey one. Along with Didion's face, the jacket comes with a price tag of $1,200. And, unfortunately, if you don't have the money right NOW, chances are the jacket won't be available when you do--all of the jackets are one-of-a-kind.

Jezebel suggests that we go Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants and opt to all go in on the price of the jacket and share it (it also only comes in a size small, which is somewhat unfortunate), or we adopt a gang leader and he or she gets to wear it like the Fonz. Our last option involves putting our DIY skills into full drive and pulling out our paintbrushes and hoping that watercolor sticks to genuine leather. On second thought, Didion's Céline ad as the screensaver for all of our electronic devices sounds much better.

Images: Getty Images (1); @aaronetsanders/Twitter