Amanda Bynes Leaves Hospital for Rehab But That's Not Necessarily a Good Thing

There's some good news, and there's some downright worrisome news. TMZ reports that Amanda Bynes left the hospital and checked into a rehab facility. According to their sources, Bynes left the UCLA medical center three weeks ago and has been staying at The Canyon, a fancy rehab center in Malibu that caters to the rich and famous. It's good news because, hey, Bynes is out of the hospital, but it's worrisome news because, to our decidedly untrained eye, we're not convinced she should be.

The 27-year-old actress was involuntarily committed to the hospital after she started a fire in a Thousand Oaks, Calif. driveway, which was the final straw in a slew of bizarre, if not entirely legal behavior that got everyone's attention. From her interesting outfit selection to her Twitter rants to her selfies to her bong-throwing, a psychiatric evaluation was a long time coming. So when she was committed in July, it seemed like positive news.

In fact, we thought Bynes was on the upswing, in a way. Even when her lawyer determined that she was unfit to stand trial, it was a sign that a problem had been identified and it gave us hope that she getting the help she so evidently needed.

But now, this news that she's at The Canyon, of all places, makes it seem like Bynes might be heading down the wrong path. Sure, The Canyons is probably a great facility that helps many people recover, but it's also known for a staff that leaks news on its celeb patients to the press, and it is an extremely well-known place.

Shouldn't Bynes seek out an establishment that is as far away from the spotlight as possible? Doesn't The Canyon seem like it might do more harm than good?

Apparently, Bynes doesn't interact much with other patients and is paranoid that the paparazzi will find her. She's not wearing her wig and doesn't leave her living quarters that often. It's unclear how long she'll stay in rehab, but TMZ points out that The Canyon doesn't have the comprehensive psychiatric facilities that the UCLA hospital does. So, hmm, is this really the best move for Bynes at this point?

Probably not, but we'll stay optimistic.