We Asked It: What Are People Doing Outside the Supreme Court On Decision Days?

All of us had to wait for the Supreme Court to rule on the biggest, most dramatic cases of their term. For most of America, that meant gluing ourselves to the @SCOTUSblog Twitter feed. Some, however, take their Court-watching more literally: This week, the humid courtyard of the nation's highest court filled with people waving signs and making statements—and yes, checking Twitter on their phones. We at Bustle had to wonder: What's the point, now that these decisions have already been, well, decided? So, we too took to the steps to investigate: Who are these civic-minded souls? What do they hope to accomplish? And most importantly, how clever are their signs? Click on to find out.

Because These Decisions are Final...

All of us had to wait for the Supreme Court to rule on the biggest, most dramatic cases of their term. For most of America, that meant gluing ourselves to the @SCOTUSblog Twitter feed. Some, however, take their Court-watching more literally: This week, the humid courtyard of the nation's highest court filled with people waving signs and making statements—and yes, checking Twitter on their phones. We at Bustle had to wonder: What's the point, now that these decisions have already been, well, decided? So, we too took to the steps to investigate: Who are these civic-minded souls? What do they hope to accomplish? And most importantly, how clever are their signs? Click on to find out.

"I came to make a statement. To tell the Supremes to stop being a pack of sexually insecure [#$&%]"

Bob Kunst, 70, who travelled all the way from Miami, was prepared with full jugs of water and a few choice words for President Obama, too.

"It's really not a protest. It's a vigil. Having a presence. Keeping watch."

Phil Portlock, 71, and his wife Pat Sloan, "60-something, and we'll leave it at that." These two were totally swarmed by reporters after the Voting Rights Act decision was announced.

"I have a unique opportunity to witness a historic decision as a constant supporter of marriage equality."

David Baker, 24 came all the way from Salt Lake City, Utah. The other side read of his sign read "If you won't let me marry my boyfriend, I'll marry your daughter."

"They might have made the decisions, but we're still breathing and there's time to repent."

We didn't get his name, but we definitely caught his message.

"I know they've already made their decision, but there's still going to be a lot more work to do."

Pastor Michael Wilker, 51, walked over from the Lutheran Church of the Reformation down the street. "I also want to be here in a prayerful way to celebrate. If they do rule same-gendered marriages legal, I'll be praising God for that."

"I'm here to show visibility. That we're flesh and blood."

Carmen Guzman, 51, who made her entrance honking and flying that flag-cape from a white convertible.

"If a case makes it all the way up, you should follow it. To put in your input. To let your voice be heard."

Kricket Smotherman, 32, her husband Brent, and son Decker turned out for the Adoptive Parents v. Baby Girl case, and to affirm that "marriage is between a man and a woman." When we asked Kricket who she hoped would hear her voice now that decisions have been decided, she answered: "My son will hear it. My son and my husband."

"The audience is anyone who will watch. I'm not here to sway opinions. I'm just here to express myself."

Bin Testa, 23 says he didn't come as part of an organized group, but adds "I shouldn't say 'I'm here by myself.' I'm with here other supporters across the country."